tri-v n.

a device or system capable of recording, transmitting, or displaying a (moving) three dimensional image; such a system as a form of entertainment

Also in forms tri-vee, trivvy, 3V, etc.

[perhaps punning on TV ‘television’]

  • 1954 T. Cogswell Invasion Report in Galaxy Science Fiction Aug. 89/2

    Bill faced the tri-V scanner and held up his hand for attention.

  • 1956 A. E. Nourse in Galaxy Science Fiction Jan. 9/1 Alan E. Nourse

    I followed the news stories like a tri-V serial and then I was heartbroken when they just disappeared.

  • 1964 P. Anderson To Build a World in Galaxy Magazine June 62/2 Poul Anderson bibliography

    The TriV programs are dull.

  • 1964 P. Gotlieb Valedictory in Amazing Stories Aug. 51/1 page image Phyllis Gotlieb bibliography

    She began to sing. I don’t know what, maybe a loony song from a trivvy commercial.

  • 1964 F. Pohl in Galaxy Magazine Oct. 161/1 Frederik Pohl

    From the integration room the readout operator could construct a speech, a 3-V commercial, a space ad or anything else…and test its appeal on his subjects.

  • 1964 F. Pohl in Galaxy Magazine Oct. 178/2 Frederik Pohl

    ‘You know, honey,’ I said as she clicked off the 3-V, ‘there isn’t any sense in this.’

  • 1965 P. Anderson Marque and Reprisal in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Feb. 6/2 page image Poul Anderson bibliography

    I said the strip show was coming on the 3V in a minute and that’s what the customers wanted, not any of his foreign stuff.

  • 1966 K. Roberts Synth in J. Carnell New Writings in SF 8 136

    The first of the day’s news bulletins began to unroll itself, the letters of the announcements standing out in startling colour from the wall trivvyscreen.

  • 1966 K. Roberts Synth in J. Carnell New Writings in SF 8 138

    Reporters boiled about, shouting questions and waving microphones; trivvyrigs darted from every side.

  • 1966 K. Roberts Synth in J. Carnell New Writings in SF 8 139

    The case of Davenport v. Davenport would have raised enough dust to satisfy even the trivvy magnates without the astounding disclosure by Mrs. Ira Amanda Davenport of the nature of the offence allegedly committed by her husband.

  • 1971 B. Bova in Galaxy Magazine Feb. 189/2 Ben Bova

    Lou sat tensely in front of the Tri-V cameras.

  • 1971 B. Bova in Galaxy Magazine Feb. 191/2 Ben Bova

    When I first came aboard this satellite Dr. Kaufman asked me to go on Tri-V and tell you something about what had happened to me.

  • 1971 J. Williamson in Galaxy Science Fiction Nov.–Dec. 136/1 Jack Williamson

    Before Guy came Ballou found me waiting on tables in a helibar and picked me to be what he call [sic] a Poppy-Cola girl. I was supposed to be on trivee to sell Poppy-Cola, but he wanted to have sex all the time—at the conventions of Poppy-Cola salesmen, up in the helicabin and even on the sofa in his private office. Most of the time he was too drunk, but he did get me pregnant.

  • 1973 R. E. Peck Final Solution 148

    When Kiley refused to get excited, she took her irritation to the trivee screen and punched for room service on the panel Kiley hadn’t seen before.

  • 1974 L. Niven & J. Pournelle Mote in God’s Eye 448 Larry Niven Jerry Pournelle bibliography

    They have given us a tri-v…and it is obviously what the humans watch. There were spokesmen for many Masters. You saw.

  • 1979 S. Wall Furlough in Asimov’s Science Fiction Nov. 95 page image Skip Wall bibliography

    A form seen only in the safe confinement of the trivee, fighting dozens of light-years away, was now made incomprehensibly real, on their porch, in the late afternoon rain.

  • 1990 J. L. Nye Volunteers in B. Fawcett Far Stars War 123

    Now what are we supposed to do?… I've never been on trivid before.

  • 1990 A. McCaffrey & J. L. Nye Death of Sleep (1992) 35 Anne McCaffrey Jody Lynn Nye bibliography

    Have I got a tri-vid team waiting to talk to me, too?

  • 1991 D. Stabenow Second Star ii. 36 Dana Stabenow

    They had bug-eyed monsters on the cover of Scientific American and little green men chasing each other across the news on every trivee screen on Terra.

  • 1999 A. Thomson Through Alien Eyes (2000) iii. 100 Amy Thomson bibliography

    Moki and Ukatonen…spent most of the day watching the Tri-V or listening to Analin and Eerin talk about them. It was fun at first, seeing themselves on the Tri-V, but they only showed the same few pictures and words.

  • 2002 R. Garcia y Robertson Ring Rats in Asimov’s Science Fiction Apr. 111 page image R. Garcia y Robertson bibliography

    Passengers packed into lounges and staterooms tuned to 3V found themselves staring up from the airless surface of Aetna II.

  • 2002 R. Garcia y Robertson Ring Rats in Asimov’s Science Fiction Apr. 111 page image R. Garcia y Robertson bibliography

    Millions of tons of misguided rock and ice hurtled right at Aetna II. An unnerving sight, even in 3V.


Research requirements

antedating 1954

Earliest cite

Theodore Cogswell, "Invasion Report"

Research History
Looking for any form: tri-V, tri-vee, 3V, etc., in any capitalization and punctuation variant.

Katrina Campbell submitted a cite for the form "tri-V" from a reprint of Alan Nourse's "Brightside Crossing"; Mike Christie verified the cite in the 1956 first magazine appearance.
Edward Bornstein submitted a 1974 cite for the form "tri-v" from Niven and Pournelle's "The Mote in God's Eye".
Katrina Campbell submitted a cite for the form "Tri-V" from a reprint of Ben Bova's "Exiled From Earth"; Mike Christie verified the cite in the 1971 first magazine appearance.
Enoch Forrester submitted a cite for the form "tri-V" from a 1979 reprint of Fritz Leiber's 1970 "America the Beautiful".
Malcolm Farmer submitted a cite for "tri-V" from an undated reprint of Theodore Cogswell's "Invasion Report"; an anonymous editor verified this in the first magazine appearance.
Rick Hauptmann submitted a 1971 cite from Jack Williamson's "The Moon Children" for the form "trivee".
Malcolm Farmer submitted a cite for the form "Trivee" from a reprint of Keith Roberts' 1969 "Therapy 2000"; Mike Christie verified the cite in a 1969 edition.
Eddie Janusz submitted a 1973 cite from Richard Peck's "Final Solution".
Douglas Winston submitted a 1991 cite for "trivee" from Dana Stabenow's "Second Star".
Jesse Sheidlower submitted a 1964 cite for "trivvy" from Phyllis Gotlieb.

Last modified 2021-01-12 03:35:08
In the compilation of some entries, HDSF has drawn extensively on corresponding entries in OED.