teleport v. 1

transitive to cause to move or travel by teleportation; esp. to convey or transport instantaneously from one place to another by means of an advanced technological device

FTL

  • 1931 E. M. Johnston & C. A. Smith Planet Entity in Wonder Stories Quarterly Fall 120/2 page image Clark Ashton Smith E. M. Johnston bibliography

    The essential elements of sea-water, minus the undesirable saline properties, can be teleported to Mars.

  • 1932 C. H. Fort Wild Talents xxvii. 312

    Girls at the front—and they are discussing their usual not very profound subjects. The alarm—the enemy is advancing. Command to the poltergeist girls to concentrate—and under their chairs they stick their wads of chewing gum. A regiment bursts into flames, and the soldiers are torches. Horses snort smoke from the combustion of their entrails. Re-enforcements are smashed under cliffs that are teleported from the Rocky Mountains. The snatch of Niagara Falls—it pours upon the battle field. The little poltergeist girls reach for their wads of chewing gum.

  • 1934 C. H. Fort Lo! in Astounding Stories May 126/1 page image Charles Fort bibliography

    This whole earth was built up by streams of rocks, teleported from other parts of an existence.

  • 1944 ‘L. Padgett’ When the Bough Breaks in Astounding Science Fiction Nov. 89/1 page image Henry Kuttner C. L. Moore bibliography

    The power isn’t disciplined yet. If I’d tried to teleport Myra Calderon over to Jersey, say, I might have dropped her in the Hudson by mistake.

  • 1953 H. Kuttner Pile of Trouble in Thrilling Wonder Stories Apr. 55/2 page image Henry Kuttner bibliography

    I have just rapidly cultured a migraine virus in my bloodstream and teleported it to your brain—you gorbellied knave!

  • 1979 R. Sheckley I Can Teleport Myself to Anywhere in M. Jakubowksi Twenty Houses of Zodiac 75 Robert Sheckley bibliography

    I can teleport myself to anywhere in the universe. This may seem an enviable ability to those who do not possess it, but I can assure you that it raises more difficulties than it solves. I found this out recently when I decided to make my first real journey as a teleporter. The latent ability had developed in me only a year before that, and I had used it at first rather timidly, and mainly in my own apartment, popping in and out of rooms and scaring my cat so badly that she took off and has never come back.

  • 1984 M. Z. Bradley World Wreckers 131 Marion Zimmer Bradley bibliography

    What little mining we have on Darkover is done with a matrix circle to locate and teleport the minerals to the surface.

  • 1989 S. Robinson Callahan’s Lady (1990) 148 Spider Robinson bibliography

    If you teleported a stranger into that room and told him he was in a whorehouse parlor, he would not believe you.

  • 1989 Omni Aug. 78/3

    You're teleported into the robot’s head, and your sensation of consciousness is there now.

  • 2005 C. Stross Accelerando vii. 311 Charles Stross bibliography

    Traditional optics are long since obsolete—tunable matter can slow photons to a stop, teleport them here to there, play ping-pong with spin and polarization—and besides, the dumb matter in the walls and floor has been replaced by low-power computronium, heat sinks dangling far below the floor of the lily-pad habitat to dispose of the scanty waste photons from reversible computation.


Research requirements

antedating 1931

Earliest cite

E. M. Johnston & Clark Ashton Smith, in Wonder Stories Quarterly

Research History
Imran Ghory submitted a 1986 cite from "ZZAP! 64" magazine.
Cory Panshin submitted a cite from a 1978 reprint of Fredric Brown's 1948 novel "What Mad Universe?"
Douglas Winston submitted a 1967 cite from Richard Grey Sipes' "Of Terrans Bearing Gifts".
Douglas Winston submitted a cite from a 1998 reprint of Sharon Shinn's "Jovah's Angel"; Mike Christie verified this in its 1997 first publication.
Douglas Winston submitted 1989 cites from Nick Pollotta and Phil Foglio's "Illegal Aliens".
Jesse Sheidlower submitted a 1931 cite from Wonder Stories Quarterly.
Malcolm Farmer submitted a cite from a reprint of Lewis Padgett's "When The Bough Breaks"; Mike Christie verified the cite in the 1944 first magazine appearance.

Last modified 2020-12-16 04:08:47
In the compilation of some entries, HDSF has drawn extensively on corresponding entries in OED.