gee n. 1

a measure of gravitation or acceleration

  • 1949 M. St. Clair Sacred Martian Pig in Startling Stories July 92/1 page image Margaret St. Clair bibliography

    I've more muscle than you, and I'm used to greater gee, being from earth.

  • 1949 M. St. Clair Sacred Martian Pig in Startling Stories July 92/2 page image Margaret St. Clair bibliography

    Martian buildings, even public ones, rarely had levitators or even lifts. The lesser gee made stair-climbing less onerous than on Terra and Martians of both sexes insisted it wasnโ€™t reasonable to avoid exercise. Stairs were good for the legs.

  • 1956 R. A. Heinlein Double Star in Astounding Science Fiction Feb. 29/2 page image Robert A. Heinlein bibliography

    The Can Doโ€”thatโ€™s this bucketโ€”is about to rendezvous with the Go For Broke, which is a high-gee torchship.

  • 1956 R. A. Heinlein Double Star in Astounding Science Fiction Feb. 33/2 page image Robert A. Heinlein bibliography

    There was a stenciled sign on the bulkhead behind the bunks: WARNING!!! Do Not Take More Than Three Gravities Without a Gee Suit.

  • 1989 L. E. Modesitt Jr. Ecolitan Operation 292 L. E. Modesitt, Jr.

    Trying to lift a shuttle on a high gee curve with a full bladder was likely to be uncomfortable, if not fatal. He sighed as he located the fresher and sprinted for it.

  • 1989 L. E. Modesitt Jr. Ecolitan Operation 328 L. E. Modesitt, Jr.

    He sat back, bouncing in his straps in the null gee, then wiped his forehead and leaned forward to reestablish a minimal gee in the courier for as long as the energy lasted.

  • 1998 I. McDonald Days of Solomon Gursky in Asimovโ€™s Science Fiction June 104 page image Ian McDonald bibliography

    The new ships were lean, mean, fast: multiple missile racks clipped to high-gee blip-fusion motors, pilots suspended in acceleration gel like flies in amber, hooked by every orifice into the big battle virtualizers.

  • 2009 Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Apr. 198

    He explored the various work areas, practicing maneuvering in zero-gee.


Research requirements

any evidence 1949

Earliest cite

Margaret St. Clair, 'The Sacred Martian Pig'

Research History
Fred Galvin submitted a 1949 cite from Margaret St. Clair's "The Sacred Martian Pig".
Malcolm Farmer submitted a cite from a 1999 reprint of Ian McDonald's 1998 "The Days of Solomon Gursky"; Jesse Sheidlower converted it to its first appearance in Asimov's Science Fiction.

Last modified 2021-01-05 18:25:51
In the compilation of some entries, HDSF has drawn extensively on corresponding entries in OED.