Subject: Genre

Different varieties and sub-varieties of literature.



Word Definition
adult fantasy n. (1932) fantasy intended for adults rather than children
alternate history n. (1954) a timeline that is different from that of our own world, usually extrapolated from the changing of a single event; the subgenre featuring such a timeline; (also) a story featuring this
anime n. (1985) a Japanese animated film or television programme, drawn in a meticulously detailed style, usually featuring characters with distinctive large, staring eyes, and typically having a science-fiction or fantasy theme, sometimes including violent or sexually explicit material; this genre of entertainment
biopunk n. (1991) a subgenre of science fiction which focuses on the societal effects of biotechnology and genetic engineering
catastrophe adj. (1948) = disaster adj.
cosy catastrophe n. (No cites) see catastrophe adj.
cyberpunk n. 1 (1984) a subgenre of science fiction typified by a bleak, high-tech setting in which a lawless subculture exists within an oppressive society dominated by computer technology
dark fantasy n. (1973) a subgenre of fantasy that features gloomy or frightening themes, incorporating elements of horror n.
disaster adj. (1975) designating a genre that deals with a global catastrophe (natural, man-made, or extraterrestrial in origin) and its aftermath
dystopia n. 2 (1955) an imaginary place or state of affairs in which conditions are extremely bad; the genre of fiction set in such a situation; cf. utopia n.
fantasy n. 1 (1932) a genre of fiction which contains elements of magic or the supernatural, frequently set in a world other than our own
future history n. (1937) a fictional, self-contained, consistent, chronological framework (esp. realized across a body of work); (also) the subgenre of science fiction that uses such a framework
future war n. (1931) a subgenre of science fiction dealing with warfare and how it will be practiced in the future
genre n. (1993) the literary fields of science fiction, fantasy, and horror collectively; imaginative fiction
genre fantasy n. (1977) stories, novels, etc. that are explicity written or published in the genre of fantasy, as opposed to ones which contain fantastic or supernatural elements but are written or published as mainstream or in another genre
genre science fiction n. (1971) stories, novels, etc. that are explicity written or published as science fiction, as opposed to ones which contain science fictional elements but are written or published as mainstream or in another genre
grimdark n. (2008) a subgenre of (esp. fantasy) fiction characterized by a nihilistic, violent, and dystopian atmosphere or setting
high fantasy n. (1973) a subgenre of fantasy set in an imaginary world with a medieval-style society and level of technology, usually featuring a quest or a conflict between Good and Evil, and often written in an elevated style
horror n. (1898) a genre intended to create a feeling of fear in the reader or viewer, especially one employing supernatural elements or monstrous creatures
imaginative adj. (1914) denoting a genre of literature, etc. that is not realistic or mimetic; science fiction, fantasy, and horror collectively
impossible story n. (1913) esp. in the early pulp era: a work of imaginative fiction; a different story n.
K/S n. (1978) a subgenre of science fiction, originally published in fanzines and now esp. online, in which the Star Trek characters Kirk and Spock are portrayed as having a homosexual relationship; (later) any similar fiction in which a pair of (established) male characters is so portrayed
mainstream adj. (1953) belonging to or characteristic of the dominant or traditional literary modes, especially representational fiction
manga n. (1951) a Japanese genre of cartoons and comic books, drawn in a meticulously detailed style, usually featuring characters with distinctive large, staring eyes, and typically having a science-fiction or fantasy theme, sometimes including violent or sexually explicit material
military science fiction n. (1979) a subgenre of science fiction that focuses on the military and warfare, esp. when the setting is outer space or other worlds
mundane adj. 2 (2004) denoting a subgenre of science fiction characterized by a rejection of themes considered scientifically implausible (as faster-than-light travel, alternate universes, etc.)
non-genre adj. (1975) not science fiction, fantasy, or horror; = mainstream adj.
planetary romance n. (1978) a subgenre of science fiction that focuses on adventures taken on a planet's surface, especially in which the description of the planet is integral to the story; a work in this subgenre
postcyberpunk adj. (1989) of or pertaining a subgenre of science fiction that employs some of cyberpunk's themes, especially the exploration of the effects of a high rate of technological change on society, but rejects the alienation and dystopianism of cyberpunk
pseudo-science n. (1927) = science fiction n.
science fantasy n. 1 (1931) = science fiction n.; a work in this genre
science fantasy n. 2 (1932) = imaginative fiction
science fantasy n. 3 (1948) a genre which combines elements of science fiction and fantasy; a work in this genre
science fantasy n. 4 (1950) a genre of science fiction characterized by phenomena which are thought to be scientifically impossible (such as time travel or ftl drives); soft science fiction n.; (also) a work in this genre
science fiction n. (1898) a genre (of fiction, film, etc.) in which the plot or setting features speculative scientific or technological advances or differences
scientific fiction n. (1876) = science fiction n.
scientific romance n. (1873) proto-science fiction written in the late 19th and early 20th centuries (especially in Britain), exemplified by H.G. Wells; in later use, science fiction that is similar in style or approach; also, a work of this kind
scientifiction n. (1916) = science fiction n.
SF/F n. (1981) science fiction and fantasy, regarded as a single broad genre
SF/F/H n. (1979) abbreviation for science fiction, fantasy, and horror
slash n. (1984) a subgenre of fiction, originally published in fanzines and now esp. online, in which characters who appear together in popular films or other media are portrayed as having a sexual (esp. homosexual) relationship
slipstream n. (1989) fiction which, while not classified as science fiction, engages to some extent with scientific or futuristic subject matter, esp. such fiction regarded as constituting an identifiable genre; this genre of fiction
space opera n. (1941) a subgenre of science fiction which uses stock characters and settings, especially those of Westerns translated into outer space; a genre of science fiction in which the action spans across a galaxy or galaxies; a work of these genres, regarded as being of an unsophisticated or clichΓ©d type
speculative fiction n. 1 (1889) = science fiction n.; (sometimes spec.) hard science fiction n.
speculative fiction n. 2 (1952) = imaginative fiction
speculative fiction n. 3 (1968) fiction which includes science fictional elements but which is regarded as not part of the genre of science fiction, as because it is soft science fiction, or to avoid a stigma felt to be associated with the term β€˜science fiction’
splatterpunk n. 1 (1987) a subgenre of horror fiction characterized by the frequent and graphic description of grisly violence, bloody deaths, and extreme sexual situations; (in later use also) a similar genre of cinema, computer games, etc.
steampunk n. 2 (1987) a subgenre of science fiction which has a historical setting (esp. based on industrialized, nineteenth-century society) and characteristically features steam-powered, mechanized machinery rather than electronic technology
subgenre n. (1955) a style or category (of fiction, film, etc.) that is a regarded as a subset of another, broader genre
sword and sorcery n. (1961) a subgenre of fantasy n. 1 which describes the adventures of larger-than-life heroes or heroines in bronze-age or medieval settings, and especially their battles with magical or supernatural foes