Subject: Genre

Different varieties and sub-varieties of literature.



Word Definition
slash n. (1984) a subgenre of fiction, originally published in fanzines and now esp. online, in which characters who appear together in popular films or other media are portrayed as having a sexual (esp. homosexual) relationship
slipstream n. (1989) fiction which, while not classified as science fiction, engages to some extent with scientific or futuristic subject matter, esp. such fiction regarded as constituting an identifiable genre; this genre of fiction
space epic n. (1943) a subgenre of science fiction featuring adventure-driven plots set in outer space; a work in this genre; cf. space opera n.
space opera n. (1941) a subgenre of science fiction featuring adventure-driven, extravagantly dramatic plots (often including elements of romance) set in outer space; a subgenre of science fiction which uses stock characters and settings, especially those of Westerns translated into outer space; a work in this genre, regarded as being of an unsophisticated or clichéd type
speculative fiction n. 1 (1889) = science fiction n. 2; (sometimes spec.) hard science fiction n.
speculative fiction n. 2 (1952) = imaginative fiction
speculative fiction n. 3 (1968) fiction which includes science fictional elements but which is regarded as not part of the genre of science fiction, as because it is soft science fiction, or to avoid a stigma felt to be associated with the term ‘science fiction’
splatterpunk n. 1 (1987) a subgenre of horror fiction characterized by the frequent and graphic description of grisly violence, bloody deaths, and extreme sexual situations; (in later use also) a similar genre of movies, video games, etc.
steampunk n. 2 (1987) a subgenre of science fiction which has a historical setting (esp. based on industrialized, nineteenth-century society) and characteristically features steam-powered, mechanized machinery rather than electronic technology
subgenre n. (1955) a style or category (of fiction, film, etc.) that is a regarded as a subset of another, broader genre
sword and sorcery n. (1961) a subgenre of fantasy n. 1 which describes the adventures of larger-than-life heroes or heroines in bronze-age or medieval settings, and especially their battles with magical or supernatural foes; = heroic fantasy n.
technothriller n. (1978) a thriller which employs science fictional technology or gadgetry
thud and blunder n. (1940) (a disparaging term for) an adventure story that features violent exploits
time opera n. (1953) a subgenre of science fiction featuring adventure-driven, extravagantly dramatic plots based on time travel; a work in this genre
urban fantasy n. (1978) a genre of fantasy that uses a (modern) city as its primary setting; a work in this genre
weird n. (1923) something that is weird adj.; weird fiction collectively
weird adj. (1923) describing supernatural horror (often in weird fiction, weird story, etc.)
weird science n. (1927) a genre that combines elements of weird with science fiction