Subject: FTL

Travelling faster than the speed of light.

Word Definition
ansible n. (1966) an instantaneous communication device, not limited by the speed of light; cf. earlier ultraphone n.
faster-than-light adj. (1940) that is traveling or can travel faster than light
faster than light adv. (1928) at a speed faster than that of light
ftl adj. (1950) faster than light speed
ftl adv. (1950) at a speed faster than that of light
gate n. (1931) a matter transmission device, esp. a portal or device through which a being, spaceship, etc. may be (instantaneously) transported to another point in space or time, or into another dimension
gateway n. (1933) a portal allowing travel or communication between dimensions, alternate universes, etc.; gate n.
hyperdrive n. (1946) a spaceship drive that enables travel faster than the speed of light; (also) the state of such travel; cf. hyperspace n.
hyperspace n. (1928) a dimension or other theoretical region that coexists with our own but typically has different physical laws, esp. such a region that allows an object to travel through it such that the total journey occurs at faster-than-light speeds; cf. hyperdrive n.
hyperspatial adj. (1934) in or relating to hyperspace n.
hyperspeed n. (1954) a speed faster than the speed of light
jump n. (1932) a journey through hyperspace n.; any (nearly) instantaneous travel over a large distance; cf. jump v.
jump v. (1952) to journey through hyperspace n.; to engage in any (nearly) instantaneous travel over a long distance; cf. jump n.
jump drive n. (1959) a spacecraft drive that enables a ship to journey through hyperspace or to engage in any instantaneous (long-distance) travel; cf. jump n., jump v.
jump engine n. (1981) = jump drive n.
jump gate n. (1995) a device that opens up a portal into hyperspace n., or otherwise enables instantaneous travel; the gateway thus opened up; cf. gate n.
jump pilot n. (1988) one who pilots a spaceship through a jump n.
jump point n. (1964) a location where interstellar jumps are possible
jumpship n. (1957) a spaceship that makes interstellar jumps
jumpspace n. (1961) hyperspace n.; the (notional) space in which ships travel during a jump
light n. 1 (1934) = lightspeed, used as a unit of measure; cf. light-speed n. 2
lightspeed n. 1 (1914) the speed of light
overdrive n. (1945) = hyperdrive n.
space warp n. (1935) a distortion of space-time that is conceived as enabling space travellers to make journeys that would otherwise be contrary to the known laws of physics
spindizzy n. (1950) in James Blishโ€™s City in Flight series: a faster-than-light antigravity drive powered by a field that alters the magnetic rotation of atoms
star drive n. (1948) a propulsion device for a spaceship capable of interstellar travel, esp. one that permits the ship to travel faster than light; cf. earlier space drive n.
stargate n. (1958) a portal or device that transports something to another point in the universe (usually another such location or device) in a manner that bypasses the intervening space; cf. gate n., jump gate n.
sub-ether n. (1930) the medium through which faster-than-light signals propagate, sometimes conceived as being on a smaller scale than "ether"
subetheric adj. (1938) of, relating to, or involving a sub-ether n. (esp. with allusion to a supposed means of faster-than-light communication)
subetherics n. (1948) a device which uses sub-ether (esp. with allusion to a supposed means of faster-than-light communication)
subspace n. (1937) a physical space subject to different physical laws from our own, typically allowing motion or communication at speeds greater than the speed of light
superluminal adj. (1959) having or being a speed greater than that of light; (also) designating an engine, etc., that can produce such a speed
superluminal adv. (1990) at a superluminal speed
superluminally adv. (1975) at a superluminal speed; faster than light
teleport n. 1 (1878) a device for conveying people or things instantaneously from one place to another, esp. a machine which breaks matter down into its constituent particles or converts it into energy, information, etc., and transmits it in this form to another location where it is reconstituted; teleporter n. 2
teleport v. 1 (1931) transitive to cause to move or travel by teleportation; esp. to convey or transport instantaneously from one place to another by means of an advanced technological device
teleport v. 2 (1944) intransitive to transport oneself instantaneously from one place to another; to travel by teleportation; (also) to be transported in this way, esp. by means of an advanced technological device
teleportation n. (1931) the instantaneous transportation from one place to another, esp. by means of a machine which breaks matter down into its constituent particles or converts it to energy, information, etc., and transmits it in this form to another location where it is reconstituted
tesser v. (1962) in Madeleine Lโ€™Engleโ€™s A Wrinkle in Time: to travel through space by means of a tesseract n.
tesseract n. (1962) in Madeleine Lโ€™Engleโ€™s A Wrinkle in Time: a means of travelling through space by manipulating the dimensions of spacetime
ultradrive n. (1951) a type of faster-than-light star drive
ultraphone n. (1928) a communications device that transmits messages faster than the speed of light
ultrawave n. (1934) a communication system that transmits messages faster than the speed of light; (also) a wave phenomenon used by such devices
warp n. (1936) = space warp n.; travel by means of a space warp, travel at warp speed
warp v. (1946) to travel through space by way of a space warp n.
warp drive n. (1948) a device by which a spaceship is enabled to travel through space by means of a space warp; a faster-than-light drive
warp speed n. (1952) a faster-than-light speed, attained by a spaceship with a propulsion mechanism capable of manipulating space-time; (also, in extended use) an extraordinarily high speed
wormhole n. (1957) an interconnection between widely separated regions of space-time, allowing faster-than-light travel between them