George Griffith

See first quotes from George Griffith

10 Quotations from George Griffith

anti-gravitational adj. 1900 G. Griffith Visit to Moon in Pearson’s Magazine Feb. 141 By means of the ‘R.Force’, or Anti-Gravitational Force, of the secret of which Lord Redgrave is the sole possessor, they are able to navigate with precision and safety the limitless ocean of space.
death ray n. 1902 G. Griffith Masters of the World in Liverpool Weekly Courier 14 June 7/2 Those who were out of reach of the terrible death-rays saw six long guns rise from the masked batteries.
disintegrator n. 1902 G. Griffith Masters of the World in Liverpool Weekly Courier 19 Apr. 1/9 If those expeditions are really armed forces, and their object is to takes these works by hook or by crook, of course we must [fight]…. Poor devils! I wonder what they’ll feel like when we turn the disintegrators on them?
earthborn adj. 1900 G. Griffith A Visit to the Moon in Pearson’s Magazine Jan. 29/2 There, that is Malapert. It is almost exactly at the south pole of the moon, and there—is the horizon of the hemisphere which no earthborn eyes but ours and Murgatroyd’s have ever seen.
energy n. 1903 G. C. Griffith World Masters xxix. 286 All-destroying, flowed the terrible energy of the disintegrator on top of the tower.
homeworld n. 1900 G. Griffith Visit to Moon in Pearson’s Magazine Jan. 7/1 Zaidie stood gazing for nearly an hour at this marvellous vision of the home-world which she had left so far behind her before she could tear herself away and allow her husband to shut the slides again.
Saturnian adj. 1900 G. Griffith In Saturn’s Realm in Pearson’s Magazine May 426 The relative position of the two giants of the Solar System at the moment when the Astronef left the surface of Ganymede, the third and largest satellite of Jupiter, was such that she had to make a journey of rather more than 340,000,000 miles before she passed within the confines of the Saturnian System.
space explorer n. 1901 G. Griffith Honeymoon in Space iv. 53 Overhead hung an ordinary tell-tale compass, and compactly placed on other parts of the wall were barometers, thermometers, barographs, and, in fact, practically every instrument that the most exacting of aeronauts or Space-explorers could have asked for.
Terra n. 1900 G. Griffith Visit to Moon in Pearson's Magazine Mar. 248 Well, after all, if you find the United States, or even the planet Terra, too small for you, we’ve always got the fields of Space open to us. We might take a trip across the Zodiac or down the Milky Way.
vessel n. 1900 G. Griffith Visit to Moon in Pearson's Magazine Feb. 146 Another signal went over the wire, the Astronef’s propellers slowed down and stopped, and the vessel began to rise swiftly towards the Zenith, which the Sun was now approaching.