Dick Eney

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42 Quotations from Dick Eney

actifan n. 1959 D. Eney Fancyclopedia II 56 This is a matter of degree, and depending on the extent to which a given fan indulges in anything more than local club activity he may be distinguished as an actifan (as opposed to passifen); stress on crifanac rather than congoing, among actifans, is the chief extensional distinction between trufans and confans.
annish n. 1959 R. H. Eney Fancylopedia II 5 ANNISH or ANNIVERSARY The issue of a subscription fanzine which comes out, or is planned to come out, in the same month as the fanzine was launched, is the occasion for great celebration by the editor, since relatively few fanzines reach even one anniversary. He often makes it an extra-large number, which contains material solicited from Big Names, and sometimes booster ads requested to help defray the additional expense. Annishthesia is the gafia-like syndrome associated with publishers who subside, stunned, after this herculean effort.
apazine n. 1959 R. Eney Fancyclopedia II (1979) 5 APA, Amateur Press Association. A group of people who publish fanzines and, instead of mailing them individually, send them to an official editor, who makes up a bundle periodically (altho these mailings have sometimes not been temporally regular) and distributes one to each member. Such apazines are contributed to the bundle by their publishers without charge, being considered exchanges for the other members' fanzines. The procedure saves time, work, and postage for the publishers; and since the mailing bundles are identical and all members may be assumed to know their contents, comments on them lead to lively discussions. For fan APAs see under FAPA, OMPA, and SAPS, all still active, and 7APA, Vanguard, and WAPA, now defunct. (Whether the Cult is an APA is hard to decide, but go ahead and look it up anyway.)
Buck Rogers adj. 1959 Fancyclopedia II 138 BUCK ROGERS STUFF What you are asked about when you mention stf to non-fans. ‘What, you read that crazy Buck Rogers stuff?’ Crazy is not used in the bopster connotation. When Philip Nowlan wrote (in the August '28 and March '29 issues of Amazing) about the adventures of Anthony Rogers, an American World War I pilot transferred to the XXV Century (via a mine cave-in followed by suspended animation), neither he nor editor Gernsback dreamed of the frightful curse they were releasing on the stfnal world’s public relations. Nowlan merely developed the idea that rocket guns (like the bazooka of 14 years later) and guerilla tactics would be hard for an enemy to handle with nothing but atomic weapons and aircraft, a thought which has occurred to modern military theorists too. Unhappily Captain Rogers lost his original Christianame and acquired the better-known one in a comic strip which was both the eponym and epitome of all the thud-and-blunder stf that ever poured from hackish typers, which is why you’re still likely to find people, sufficiently shocked, expressing their horror in the sentence quasi-quoted above.
con n. 1959 R. Eney Fancyclopedia II (1979) 33 Coming together of fans from various localities, usually at a call issued by some organization or local group. And the designation is used as a combining word to make up some distinctive name for the brawl—either ‘con’ itself or its completions, -vention, -ference, -clave, or -fabulation. These words are not equivalent, for convention usually refers to the principal annual gathering; other formal get-togethers are conferences or conclaves.
congoing n. 1959 R. Eney Fancyclopedia II 175 The gathering (brainstormed by John Newman) that marked the postwar revival of congoing in England.
conreport n. 1959 R. Eney Fancyclopedia II 172 A conreport of impressive bulk, The Harp Stateside, recorded Walt’s adventures here and the campaign had much to do with development of the present entente cordiale between American and English fandom.
croggle v. 1959 R. Eney Fancyclopedia II 38 Croggle…roughly meaning shocked into momentary physical or mental paralysis; a portmanteau-word, apparently, combining ‘crushed’™ and ‘˜goggled’€™, and usually passive or reflexive in application.
fanac n. 1959 R. Eney Fancyclopedia II 164 In connection with TAFF a furor arose over the definition of a Trufan, the active faction insisting that a trufan exhibit his quality by some sort of fanac—crifanac for choice—while others maintained that nomination to or interest in so stefnistic an enterprise as TAFF was sufficient to prove fannishness.
fan fiction n. 1959 R. Eney Fancyclopedia II (1979) 56 Fan fiction, (1) Sometimes meaning by fans in the manner of pros; that is, ordinary fantasy published in a fanzine. Properly, it means (2) fiction by fans about fans (or sometimes about pros) having no necessary connection with stfantasy.
fannish adj. 1959 R. H. Eney Fancyclopedia II 15 No less important to fannish than mundane drinking, this useful beverage is even given divine honors by the sect of Beeros, and worshipped either as Beer or Bheer.
fannish adj. 1959 R. H. Eney Fancyclopedia II 47 VanC walked thru the glass door of the Downey (Cal.) public library one day in 1950, winning fannish notoreity [sic] and a mention in the local paper.
fannishness n. 1959 R. Eney Fancyclopedia II 164 In connection with TAFF a furor arose over the definition of a Trufan, the active faction insisting that a trufan exhibit his quality by some sort of fanac—crifanac for choice—while others maintained that nomination to or interest in so stefnistic an enterprise as TAFF was sufficient to prove fannishness.
fantasy n. 1 1969 R. H. Eney Swords & Sorcery in L. S. de Camp & G. H. Scithers Conan Swordbook (1969) x Directly, Amra’s articles deal with what we call Heroic Fantasy, or sword-and-sorcery fiction—that kind of story in which heroes and villains may cast a spell or wield a blade with equal propriety, according to the terrain and the tactical situation: in a general sense, stories with pre-gunpowder technology in which magic works. In addition to their basic devotion, they touch on other heroes created by Howard; some other Conan-like heroic heroes written of by different authors; and people in sword-and-sorcery settings who are principal characters without being exactly heroic about it.
femmefan n. 1959 D. Eney Fancyclopedia II 62 FANNE (pronounced ‘fan’). A female fan; also femmefan. Nancy Share tried to introduce Firl, but this didn’t catch on. Feminine objection to this term is caused by clods giving the silent E full value (cf Fanspeak).
fillo n. 1959 R. H. Eney Fancyclopedia II 7 Fragmentary sketches are also used as fillers (hence the byname fillo) or sometimes stuck around on the page to break up the dead-solid type.
fugghead n. 1959 R. Eney Fancyclopedia II (1979) 73 fugghead (Laney), a close relative of the LMJ. Tho Art Rapp once defined the term as ‘someone who disagrees with Laney’, a fugghead is more correctly one who speaks before he thinks, if indeed he thinks at all; a maker of asinine statements, silly assertions, and fraudulent claims. ‘A fugghead is a stupid oaf with a babbling tongue,’ defines Tucker concisely. First part of the word is bowdlerized; a little thought will suffice to translate it.
fuggheaded adj. 1959 R. Eney Fancyclopedia II (1979) 62 He puts stf into everything he says and does—his work, school papers, den, 'n' everything. He’s a good deal of a fuggheaded dope. Fortunately the picture is not true to life, is it?
fuggheadedness n. 1959 R. H. Eney Fancyclopedia II 54 The Second or Little Exclusion Act, so called, was a piffling affair at the NYCon II when the con committee briefly refused to allow any attendees who had not paid for the banquet ($7) to listen to the dinner speakers from the balcony overlooking the hall. But this was resented rather as fuggheadedness than malice.
gafiate v. 1959 R. H. Eney Fancyclopedia II 134 Quandry [ sic ] (Hoffwoman), the famous fanzine published by Lee Hoffman of Savannah Ga. before she gafiated for the first time.
gafiation n. 1959 D. Eney Fancyclopedia II 61 It was alleged that it folded with the gafiation of Keasler, Vick, and Leeh (especially) and the corresponding lapse of their fanzines.
heroic fantasy n. 1969 R. H. Eney Swords & Sorcery in L. S. de Camp & G. H. Scithers Conan Swordbook (1969) x Directly, Amra’s articles deal with what we call Heroic Fantasy, or sword-and-sorcery fiction—that kind of story in which heroes and villains may cast a spell or wield a blade with equal propriety, according to the terrain and the tactical situation: in a general sense, stories with pre-gunpowder technology in which magic works. In addition to their basic devotion, they touch on other heroes created by Howard; some other Conan-like heroic heroes written of by different authors; and people in sword-and-sorcery settings who are principal characters without being exactly heroic about it.
illo n. 1959 R. Eney Fancyclopedia II (1979) 87 Illo, an illustration. Either the original or a reproduction may be meant.
mundane n. 1 1959 R. H. Eney Fancyclopedia II 48 Dressed-up Mundanes, hackwork in which fantastic elements could be replaced with non-fantastic ones without changing the plot essentially.
mundane adj. 1 1959 R. Eney Fancyclopedia II (1979) 109 Mundane, non-fannish. Pertaining to the Outside World.
mundane adj. 1 1959 R. H. Eney Fancyclopedia II 24 Or they may be ‘fannish translations’ of mundane stories/conventions.
mundane adj. 1 1959 R. H. Eney Fancyclopedia II 15 No less important to fannish than mundane drinking, this useful beverage is even given divine honors by the sect of Beeros, and worshipped either as Beer or Bheer.
neofan n. 1959 R.H. Eney Fancyclopedia II 50 Since then it has been an open secret and Jacob Edwards has been used by various fen as a serconfanfiction character, usually as a good-natured neofan.
pseudo-science n. 1944 ‘J. Bristol’ Fancylopedia 69/2 pseudoscience — Scientific explanations which actually clash with accepted scientific beliefs, but by glossing-over pass for plausibility to the untutored minds of Fantastic Adventures' audience and other children. The use of the word to describe science-fiction in general is fiercely fought by lovers of the literature.
science fantasy n. 1 1959 R. Eney Fancyclopedia II (1979) 142 Science-fantasy, a classification sometimes used for science-fiction proper. But in this volume it designates science-fiction in which fantasy elements are vital—e g Lest Darkness Fall, in which hero Padway is struck by lightning and thus transferred to decadent Rome, where all his other actions are science-fictional; or those in which the author (like Ego Clarke in The City and The Stars ) depicts the accomplishments of a science so advanced that it merges with wish-fulfillment fantasy.
science fantasy n. 3 1959 R. Eney Fancyclopedia II (1979) 142 Science-fantasy, a classification sometimes used for science-fiction proper. But in this volume it designates science-fiction in which fantasy elements are vital—e g Lest Darkness Fall, in which hero Padway is struck by lightning and thus transferred to decadent Rome, where all his other actions are science-fictional; or those in which the author (like Ego Clarke in The City and The Stars ) depicts the accomplishments of a science so advanced that it merges with wish-fulfillment fantasy.
science fantasy n. 4 1959 R. Eney Fancyclopedia II (1979) 142 Science-fantasy, a classification sometimes used for science-fiction proper. But in this volume it designates science-fiction in which fantasy elements are vital—e g Lest Darkness Fall, in which hero Padway is struck by lightning and thus transferred to decadent Rome, where all his other actions are science-fictional; or those in which the author (like Ego Clarke in The City and The Stars ) depicts the accomplishments of a science so advanced that it merges with wish-fulfillment fantasy.
scientifilm n. 1959 R. Eney Fancyclopedia II 143 A prefix which should indicate only ‘scientific’ (as in ‘scientifiction’) but in use may mean ‘science-fictional’ (as ‘scientifilm’) or even designate something pertaining to fandom.
sense of wonder n. 1959 R. Eney Fancyclopedia II 145 Sense of wonder (Moskowitz), that which characterizes stfnists (def. 2) in general; and, the quality in science-fiction that arouses their admiration. Much jeering at SaM’s expense has accompanied his proclamations of need for/discovery of this commodity, and many doubt that the phrase really describes anything more definite than the glow of enjoyment.
skyhook n. 3 1959 R. H. Eney Fancyclopedia II 71 Many ‘saucer’ sightings were laid to ‘skyhooks’—high-altitude balloons—airplane lights, bright stars and planets, reflections of all sorts, kites, and odd-looking planes.
slan n. 1959 R. Eney Fancyclopedia II (1979) 33 A confabulation is an informal meeting larger than a mere fan visit but not built up or conducted like a conference; the word is pretty near obsolete, but popular in the early 40s. The most important thing about a con is that the slans can get together with their own kind of people, perhaps forgetting their introversion for a while, and do what they want to do and fangab about mutually interesting things and develop their stfnic personalities.
stf n. 1959 R. H. Eney Fancyclopedia II 59 Eofandom, from about 1930 to 1933, existed before fandom became an entity; generally comprised of folk with no sense of group existence whose interests were in collecting stf and scientificomics, and who eagerly hunted down any items with any sort of stfnal significance.
stfdom n. 1959 R. Eney Fancyclopedia II 129 In practice most of the fan-pro prejudice Tucker remarks is turned against those their own sections of stfdom admit to be obnoxious—7th Fandom and the other Beanie Brigadiers, and the less scrupulous or more conceited professionals.
stfnal adj. 1959 R. H. Eney Fancyclopedia II 59 Eofandom, from about 1930 to 1933, existed before fandom became an entity; generally comprised of folk with no sense of group existence whose interests were in collecting stf and scientificomics, and who eagerly hunted down any items with any sort of stfnal significance.
sword and sorcery n. 1969 R. H. Eney Swords & Sorcery in L. S. de Camp & G. H. Scithers Conan Swordbook (1969) x Directly, Amra’s articles deal with what we call Heroic Fantasy, or sword-and-sorcery fiction—that kind of story in which heroes and villains may cast a spell or wield a blade with equal propriety, according to the terrain and the tactical situation: in a general sense, stories with pre-gunpowder technology in which magic works. In addition to their basic devotion, they touch on other heroes created by Howard; some other Conan-like heroic heroes written of by different authors; and people in sword-and-sorcery settings who are principal characters without being exactly heroic about it.
trufan n. 1959 R. Eney Fancyclopedia II 164 In connection with TAFF a furor arose over the definition of a Trufan, the active faction insisting that a trufan exhibit his quality by some sort of fanac—crifanac for choice—while others maintained that nomination to or interest in so stefnistic an enterprise as TAFF was sufficient to prove fannishness.
worldcon n. 1959 R. Eney Fancyclopedia II (1979) 34 1939 NYCon I was held in New York 2-4 July under the auspices of New Fandom as the World Science Fiction Convention, "First" being added later. Annual Worldcons were not at first contemplated. From the 1979 facsimile edition. Note that ‘Worldcon’ is a trademark owned by the World Science Fiction Society, and has an initial cap.