Sam Moskowitz

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Sam Moskowitz

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16 Quotations from Sam Moskowitz

fantasy n. 2 1953 S. Moskowitz Book Reviews in Science-Fiction + Aug. 27/3 While readable, the collection is quite undistinguished, the brightest light being one of C. L. Moore’s early fantasies, ‘Scarlet Dream,’ which still engenders in the reviewer some of the color that gave C. L. Moore her early reputation.
future war n. 1969 S. Moskowitz in A. H. Norton & S. Moskowitz Great Untold Stories of Fantasy & Horror 58 Perhaps his best-known work to fantasy collectors was The Conquest of America, a future-war story published by George H. Doran Co. in 1916.
impossible story n. 1957 S. Moskowitz in How Science Fiction Got Its Name in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Feb. 67/1 Another term often found in the readers' departments of Munsey magazines was impossible stories. That term received some use up until about 1920 when it all but disappeared…. It was awkward to state in every issue that ‘we will continue to present “different stories.”’
off-trail adj. 1957 S. Moskowitz 1957 in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Feb. 66/2 At first such tales were referred to as OFF-TRAIL STORIES, but this was too all-inclusive and could also mean anything from a story told in the second person to a western yarn with a Christmas setting. To solve the problem, Argosy created the term DIFFERENT STORIES.
pseudo-science n. 1957 S. Moskowitz 1957 in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Feb. 76/2 Similarly, when a 1949 cover of The Writer’s Monthly featured a review of ‘pseudo science’ publication requirements, many of the newer writers weren’t quite sure what was being referred to, so anachronistic had the term become.
pseudo-scientific adj. 1957 S. Moskowitz 1957 in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Feb. 69/2 Within a few months, however, Weird Tales had adopted Argosy' s term of ‘pseudo-scientific stories’ on its contents page. It is of parenthetical interest to note that ‘pseudoscientific’ was often used as a single word by Argosy.
pseudo-scientific adj. 1957 S. Moskowitz 1957 in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Feb. 67/1 Another term often found in the readers' departments of Munsey magazines was IMPOSSIBLE STORIES. That term received some use up until about 1920 when it all but disappeared. It was awkward to state in every issue that ‘we will continue to present “different stories.”’ Therefore they evolved a new term that received widespread use throughout the publishing world, and in the early twenties was by far the most popular single reference to the genre, even though everything else under the sun kept popping up. The new term was PSEUDO-SCIENTIFIC STORIES, and they might still be using it today if it hadn’t been for Hugo Gernsback.
science fantasy n. 3 1957 S. Moskowitz 1957 in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Feb. 66/1 The rise of H. G. Wells with his The Time Machine, The War of the Worlds, and When the Sleeper Wakes, towards the end of the 19th century, found him inheriting that term along with the frequent use of SCIENTIFIC FANTASIES to describe some of his work that seemed too scientific to be fantasy and too borderline to be scientifically plausible. SCIENCE FANTASY is still commonly used today to describe work of that nature.
science fantasy n. 4 1953 S. Moskowitz Book Reviews in Science-Fiction + Dec. 65/1 One of the unquestioned titans of fantasy fiction was A. Merritt. His mastery was evidenced most strongly in his tales which may be defined loosely as science-fantasies, stories which have some basis in scientific fact, but which would not qualify under any tight definition of science-fiction.
scientific fiction n. 1946 Famous Fantastic Mysteries Aug. 127/1 Want to join a live-wire organization for readers of fantastic and scientific fiction?
scientific fiction n. 1923 Science & Invention Aug. (cover) Scientific Fiction Number [i.e. issue].
scientific romance n. 1957 S. Moskowitz 1957 in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Feb. 66/1 In England, Verne’s stories were dubbed SCIENTIFIC ROMANCES, and the term became so entrenched that when C. A. Hinton wrote a series of semi-fictional scientific speculations as to the nature of the fourth dimension and other imaginative subjects in 1888, they were published under the title of Scientific Romances.
scientifictionally adv. 1963 S. Moskowitz Fritz Leiber in Amazing Stories Dec. 88/2 It was done in the broad, blatant tones of a Robert Block broadside, intending to scientifictionally spoof writers, agents, publishers, and their associates.
scientifilm n. 1954 S. Moskowitz Immortal Storm 13 The first two numbers of The Time Traveller, like its announcing circular, were mimeographed. The main feature of the initial issue was a complete list of extant fantastic moving pictures (or, as they have come to be known, "scientifilms") contributed by Forrest J. Ackerman of California.
sword and sorcery n. 1965 S. Moskowitz in L. Margulies Worlds of Weird Introd. 12 Fearsome menace would be conquered in epic sagas of the character of ‘Valley of the Worm’ by Robert E. Howard. Sword and sorcery would be encountered out of space and out of time in such tales as ‘The Sapphire Goddess’ by Nictzin Dyalhis.
weirdist n. 1951 S. Moskowitz Immortal Storm v. 20 Almost every weirdist of importance in fandom was at one time or another represented in its [sc. Fantasy Fan’s] pages.