Chad Oliver

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Chad Oliver

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14 Quotations from Chad Oliver

alien n. 1954 C. Oliver Friend to Man in W. F. Nolan Edge of Forever (1971) 111 The trouble is…that you have a word, ‘alien,’ and no concept to go with it.
android n. 1957 C. Oliver Didn't He Ramble in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Apr. 125/1 Robots, of course—or androids, to give them their proper names. Brilliant ones. You couldn’t tell the difference unless you looked too close.
atomics n. 1 1952 C. Oliver Blood's a Rover in Astounding Science-Fiction May 17/2 The two men fell silent then, looking at the neat brown rows of sacks, feeling the star ship tremble slightly under them with the thunder of her great atomics.
faster-than-light adj. 1952 C. Oliver First to Stars in Astounding Science-Fiction July 136/1 The Viking was not, of course, a faster-than-light ship.
humanoid adj. 1954 C. Oliver Field Expedient in W. F. Nolan Edge of Forever (1971) 141 The ship carried two pilots, a navigator, a doctor, fifty babies, twenty-five special humanoid robots, computers, and supplies.
hyperspace n. 1952 C. Oliver First to Stars in W. F. Nolan Edge of Forever (1971) 237 It was a sub-space survey report—normal space being subspace with respect to their ship, the Wilson Langford, in hyperspace—and seemed to be routine enough at first glance.
planet-wide adj. 1954 C. Oliver Field Expedient in W. F. Nolan Edge of Forever (1971) 137 After a million years or so of bashing in each other’s brains with bigger and better weapons, the human animal had finally achieved a fairly uniform, stable, planetwide civilization.
robot n. 1955 C. Oliver Field Expedient in Astounding Science-Fiction Jan. 91/2 The ship carried two pilots, a navigator, a doctor, fifty babies, twenty-five special humanoid robots, computers, and supplies.
space-suited adj. 1952 C. Oliver First to Stars in W. F. Nolan Edge of Forever (1971) 255 The efficient team of the launch, spacesuited for protection, swung the emergency air lock and cutter into position.
star drive n. 1952 C. Oliver Blood's a Rover in Astounding Science Fiction May 33/1 Man’s horizons exploded to the rims of the universe with the perfection of the star drive—he was no longer living on a world but in an inhabited universe.
Terra n. 1953 C. Oliver Ant & Eye in W. F. Nolan Edge of Forever (1971) 189 And after you tell us dummies what to do to save Beloved Terra, come on back and we’ll have a beer.
time track n. 1959 C. Oliver Transfusion in W. F. Nolan Edge of Forever (1971) 45 No amount of twaddle about alternate time-tracks and congruent universes is going to change that.
Venusian adj. 1954 C. Oliver Field Expedient in W. F. Nolan Edge of Forever (1971) 143 The ten Earth-days of the Venusian night had been busy and full, and spiced with the exoticism of the truly new.
viewport n. 1952 C. Oliver First to Stars in W. F. Nolan Edge of Forever (1971) 242 But more wonderful still was the soft, steady light from the myriad of stars that were suspended in the black velvet of the viewports.