Brian Stableford

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Brian Stableford

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17 Quotations from Brian Stableford

alternate history n. 1984 B. Stableford The SF Sub-genres in D. Wingrove Science Fiction Source Book (1984) 51 Essays in alternate history have long been a favorite game among historians, but as respectable intellectuals the historians have been timid in their ventures. SF writers, by contrast, are anything but timid—what they often lack is a sense of historical coherency.
alternate world n. 1979 B. Stableford Alternate World in P. Nicholls Encyclopedia of Science Fiction 26/1 An alternate world is an image of Earth as it might be, consequent upon some hypothetical alteration of history. Many sf stories use the notion of parallel worlds as a frame in which alternate worlds can be held simultaneously and may even interact with one another.
alternative world n. 1993 B. Stableford Alternate World in J. Clute & P. Nicholls Encyclopedia of Science Fiction 23/1 An alternate world—some writers and commentators prefer the designation ‘alternative world’ on grammatical grounds—is an account of Earth as it might have become in consequence of some hypothetical alteration in history.
artificial intelligence n. 2006 B. Stableford Plurality of Worlds in Asimov’s Science Fiction Aug. 115 You cannot imagine what a handful of renegade artificial intelligences might do to the prospects of human progress.
cyborgization n. 1994 B. Stableford Les Fleurs du Mal in Asimov’s Science Fiction Oct. 125 He was playing about with brainfeed equipment…. Not just memory boxes or neural stimulators, but mental cyborgization.
cyborgized adj. 1999 B. Stableford Architects of Emortality 113 Suitskins designed for everyday use were purely organic—even supposedly state-of-the-art sexsuits and commercially augmented VE trippers were only lightly cyborgized—but the suitskin Paul had been wearing was nearly 40 percent inorganic. Fortunately, there was no law specifying the limits of explicit neural cyborgization in artificial constructions.
cyborgized adj. 2000 B. Stableford Fountains of Youth lxx. 304 The highkickers were serious about the possibilities of cyborgization, and there were many among them who felt that if cyborgization was the price they would have to pay to establish authentic Utopias in the ice-palace cities that awaited them on Titan and the Uranian moons, then it was a price well worth paying. There were not quite so many who felt that the work of galactic exploration ought to be the province of cyborgized humans rather than silver-piloted probes, but there were enough of them to force the progress of human-machine hybridization into ever-more-adventurous channels.
genre fantasy n. 1996 B. Stableford Third Generation Genre Science Fiction in Science-Fiction Studies Nov. 322 It was, for instance, one of the factors involved in the dramatic displacement of genre sf by genre fantasy, because it is much easier for writers to construct in novelistic detail—and for readers to orientate themselves within—a Secondary World which is a straightforward Earth-clone than it is to create a world which is radically differentiated from our own along any of the axes typical of sf.
primary world n. 2004 B. Stableford Discovery of Secondary Worlds in N.Y. Review of Science Fiction #192 Aug. 6/2 The writer, as an omnipotent secondary creator, need only state that the world within the text mirrors the primary world to establish the fact to his own satisfaction.
sapient n. 2000 B. Stableford Fountains of Youth xxvi. 116 I was never happy about those war-addicted fools hijacking the label Homo sapiens. We're the ones who have the opportunity to be true sapients, and I think we ought to take it.
scientific romance n. 1985 B. N. Stableford Scientific Romance in Britain 1890-1950 3 In view of this, the decision to use the old-fashioned and rather quaint term ‘scientific romance’ as a description may seem odd, but the reason for doing so is to make the point that the British tradition of speculative fiction developed during the period under consideration quite separately from the American tradition of science fiction, and can be contrasted with it in certain important ways.
scientific romance n. 1985 B. N. Stableford Scientific Romance in Britain 1890-1950 9 Scientific romance is the romance of the disenchanted universe: a universe in which new things can and must appear by virtue of the discoveries of scientists and the ingenuity of inventors, and a universe where alien places are populated according to the logic of the theory of evolution.
scientific romance n. 1985 B. N. Stableford Scientific Romance in Britain 1890-1950 8 A scientific romance is a story which is built around something glimpsed through a window of possibility from which scientific discovery has drawn back the curtain.
secondary world n. 2004 B. Stableford Discovery of Secondary Worlds in N.Y. Review of Science Fiction #192 Aug. 10/2 Instead of fantastic elements merely intruding upon their home territory, the protagonists of portal fantasies are physically removed to unfamiliar ground, into a secondary world.
shapeshifting n. 1984 B. Stableford The SF Sub-genres in D. Wingrove Science Fiction Source Book (1984) 58 Within SF itself several writers have played the game of constructing pseudoscientific versions of well-known supernatural phenomena such as shape-shifting (e.g. ‘There Shall Be No Darkness’, 1950, by James Blish) and vampirism (e.g. I Am Legend, 1954, by Richard Matheson).
universe n. 1996 B. Stableford Third Generation Genre Science Fiction in Science-Fiction Studies Nov. 329 Books set in that universe are not set-and-location limited in the same way that the TV shows are, nor are they closely bound to specific special-effects technologies—but that does not mean that they enjoy the same narrative freedom as books set in other science-fictional universes.
uplift n. 2003 B. Stableford Year Zero 116 That much of what the Devil had said was true—but as for the rest of it…well, he seemed to know about her little excursion to Altair, but he hadn’t said a word about the impending uplift of humankind by the greys' psychotropic viruses.