Eric Frank Russell

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Eric Frank Russell

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21 Quotations from Eric Frank Russell

astronavigation n. 1941 E. F. Russell Jay Score in Astounding Science-Fiction May 100/1 To qualify for membership, you had to perform a feat of astro-navigation tantamount to a miracle.
astronavigator n. 1941 E. F. Russell Jay Score in Astounding Science-Fiction May 95/1 The stunt was a theoretical one frequently debated by mathematicians and astro-navigators, and often used by writers in stories. But this time it was to be the real thing. The idea is to build up all the velocity that can be got, and at the same time to angle into the path of an elongated elliptical orbit resembling that of a comet. In theory, the vessel might then skim the Sun so fast that it would swing like a pendulum far out to the opposite side of the orbit whence it had come.
dayside n. 1955 E. F. Russell Waitabits in Astounding Science Fiction July 73/1 The Thunderer went up, came down four hundred miles within the night-side. The tactic, decided Leigh, represented a right smart piece of figuring. Aroused aliens on the day-side would now require about twelve days to reach them.
esp v. 1949 E. F. Russell Glass Eye in Astounding Science Fiction Mar. 41/1 Eenif gestured toward the metal wall through which both of them could esp the new world in all its glowing colors.
esp v. 1953 E. F. Russell Postscript in Science Fiction Plus Oct. 32/2 They have esp and are telepathic. You think the questions and they write the answers. They read books by esping them. I’ve seen one hold a pen in a dozen fibers like long hairs and make a copy of what it had no eyes to see.
force screen n. 1950 E. F. Russell Dear Devil in Other Worlds Science Stories May 12/1 Later, he found a dry cave in the hill on which his objective stood. It took him two days of careful, cautious raying to square its walls, ceiling and floor, plus half a day with a powered fan driving out silicate dust. After that, he stowed his supplies at the back, parked the sled near the front, set up a curtaining force-screen across the entrance. The hole in the hill was now home.
Homo superior n. 1946 E. F. Russell Metamorphosite in Astounding Science Fiction Dec. 20/2 The battle was to be one of homo superior versus homo sapiens plus the Dranes plus other things of unknown abilities—with the odds much in favor of the combine.
jet car n. 1946 E. F. Russell Metamorphosite in Astounding Science Fiction Dec. 7/2 The sextet took an elevator to ground level, found a jet car waiting for them, a long, black sedan.
materialize v. 1937 E. F. Russell & L. T. Johnson Seeker of To-Morrow in Astounding Stories July 143/1 ‘How did you know that I am a time traveler?’ I demanded. ‘Because your time-traveling device materialized out of thin air before the eyes of half a hundred citizens’.
needle v. 1943 E. F. Russell Symbiotica in Astounding Science-Fiction Oct. 152/2 These things were the remains of the two natives he’d needled, but the needlers had not caused that awful rotting of the flesh.
needle-ray n. 1943 E. F. Russell Symbiotica in Astounding Science Fiction Oct. 158/1 A needle ray spurted from behind me, lanced dangerously close to my helmet, and burned a bush.
nightside n. 1955 E. F. Russell Waitabits in Astounding Science Fiction July 73/1 The Thunderer went up, came down four hundred miles within the night-side. The tactic, decided Leigh, represented a right smart piece of figuring. Aroused aliens on the day-side would now require about twelve days to reach them.
ob- prefix [1951 E. F. Russell …And Then There Were None in Astounding Science-Fiction June 29/2 Now…you've done something for me. That means you've planted an ob on me. I don’t thank you for what you've done. There’s no need to. All I have to do is get rid of the ob.]
sentient adj. 1954 E. F. Russell Witness in Deep Space 64 I did not trap it. I knew it was sentient and treated it as such.
space conquest n. 1946 E. F. Russell Metamorphosite in Astounding Science Fiction Dec. 14/1 The position is that every time we make a landing we take the tremendous risk of presenting our secrets of space conquest to people of unknown abilities and doubtful ambitions.
space conquest n. 1949 E. F. Russell in Astounding Science Fiction Feb. 58/2 The biped tribes have united since the last great holocaust and they need all their unity to cope with space-conquest now that it has reached its present stage.
spaceline n. 1953 E. F. Russell It's In Blood in Fantastic Universe June–July 175/1 She would be so happy and proud at having given the space-lines another Fanshaw.
space tug n. 1942 E. F. Russell Describe Circle in Astounding Science Fiction Mar. 130/2 Martiacast VXV calling Vanguard. Can now observe theStarider. You've permission to enter the sphere of Mars to make contact with vessel. Are ordering out space tugs.
teleport n. 2 1951 E. F. Russell Star Watchers in Startling Stories Nov. 54/1 The bolts and bars and tell-tale beams could easily be detected by any mutant endowed with first-class ESP, but he'd be unable to do anything about them. On the other hand, a teleport could manipulated the lot without any trouble—if only he could see them. So the place is wide open to a multi-talented mutant such as a teleport with ESP.
tight-beamed adj. 1951 E. F. Russell Star Watchers in Startling Stories Nov. 45/1 He send out a powerful, tight-beamed mind call far below the normal telepathic band. ‘Charles!’
vessel n. 1942 E. F. Russell Describe Circle in Astounding Science Fiction Mar. 130/2 A terrific burst of thunder came from the rockets and the whole vessel slewed round.