Isaac Asimov

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Isaac Asimov

See all quotes from Isaac Asimov

25 First Quotations from Isaac Asimov

chronoscopy n. 1956 I. Asimov Dead Past in Astounding Science Fiction Apr. 7/1 Mr. Araman, I came to you because you’re top man in chronoscopy…I've come to you, sir, because for two years I have been trying to obtain permission to do some time viewing—chronoscopy, that is—in connection with my researches on ancient Carthage.
chronoscopy n. 1956 I. Asimov Dead Past in Astounding Science Fiction Apr. 8/1 You must realize, Dr. Potterley, that chronoscopy, or time-viewing, if you prefer, is a difficult process…And there is a long waiting line for the chronoscope and an even longer waiting line for the use of Multivac which guides us in our use of the controls.
chronoscopy n. 1956 I. Asimov Dead Past in Astounding Science Fiction Apr. 17/1 ‘I can’t be sure yet, Caroline, but when I've got enough evidence, I'll apply for permission to use chronoscopy, which will settle the matter once and for all.’ ‘Chronoscopy?’ ‘Time-viewing. We can focus on ancient Carthage at some time of crisis, the landing of Scipio Africanus in 202 B.C., for instance, and see with our own eyes exactly what happens.’
Earth-normal adj. 1949 I. Asimov Victory Unintentional in Invasion From Mars: Interplanetary Stories 147 They had six legs apiece, stumpy and thick, designed to lift tons against two and a half times normal Earth gravity. Their reflexes were that many times Earth-normal speed, to make up for the gravity.
Frankenstein complex n. 1947 I. Asimov Little Lost Robot in Astounding Science Fiction Mar. 116/1 I’ll admit that this Frankenstein Complex you’re exhibiting has a certain justification—hence the First Law in the first place.
galactographic adj. 1950 I. Asimov …And Now You Don't in Astounding Science Fiction Jan. 115/1 Nor were the galactographic verities of the situation lost upon Stettin.
galactography n. 1950 I. Asimov …And Now You Don’t in Astounding Science Fiction Jan. 113/2 ‘Galactography,’ said the mayor, ‘is our greatest enemy. Our admirals make no secret of our almost hopeless, strategic position.’
galaxy-wide adj. 1940 I. Asimov Homo Sol in Astounding Science-Fiction Sept. 124/1 We have a race of Humanoids of a superlatively technological turn; possessing at the same time an intrinsically unscientific belief in supernatural forces, an incredibly childish predilection toward individuality, singly and in groups, and, worst of all, lack of sufficient vision to embrace a galaxy-wide culture.
gravitics n. 2 1982 I. Asimov Foundation's Edge 54 I've been trained in space navigation, but not on these ships. If something goes wrong with the gravitics, I'm afraid there’s nothing I can do about it.
gynoid n. 1979 I. Asimov Editorial: The Vocabulary of SF in Isaac Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine Sept. 8 Strictly speaking, an android should be an artificial device with the appearance of a male human being. One with the appearance of a female human being would be a ‘gynoid’, from the Greek word ‘gynos’ meaning ‘woman’. However, I have never seen the word ‘gynoid’ used for any artificial device of human appearance. ‘Android’ is used for artificial devices that mimic either sex—or, for that matter, that are neuter.
humanoid n. 1940 I. Asimov Homo Sol in Astounding Science-Fiction Sept. 118/1 I have here…the official report from Alpha Centauri, on whose fifth planet the Humanoids of Sol have landed.
humanoid adj. 1940 I. Asimov Homo Sol in Astounding Science-Fiction Sept. 118/1 Beings of every manlike type and shape were there. Some were tall and polelike, some broad and burly, some short and stumpy. There were those with long, wiry hair, those with scanty gray fuzz covering head and face, others with thick, blond curls piled high, and still others entirely bald. Some possessed long, hair-covered trumpets of ears, others had tympanum membranes flush with their temples. There were those present with large gazellelike eyes of a deep-purple luminosity, others with tiny optics of a beady black. There was a delegate with green skin, one with an eight-inch proboscis and one with a vestigial tail. Internally, variation was almost infinite. But all were alike in two things. They were all Humanoid. They all possessed intelligence.
humanoid adj. 1940 I. Asimov Homo Sol in Astounding Science-Fiction Sept. 130/1 And I hope these learned gentlemen still react in a vaguely Humanoid way.
jump v. 1952 I. Asimov Currents of Space in Astounding Science Fiction Oct. 67/2 It’s different in different places and we have to know exactly what it is in order to allow ships to calculate exactly how to jump through hyperspace.
Law of Robotics n. [1941 I. Asimov Liar! in Astounding Science-Fiction May 53/2 ‘You know the fundamental law impressed upon the positronic brain of all robots, of course.’…‘Certainly…. On no conditions is a human being to be injured in any way, even when such injury is directly ordered by another human.’]
light-minute n. 1945 I. Asimov Mule in Astounding Science Fiction Nov. 42/1 We traveled about a light-minute or so, in neutral, right past Horleggor.
pseudo-grav n. 1952 I. Asimov Martian Way in Galaxy Science Fiction Nov. 36/1 Then you would have to hike the pseudo-grav field of your suit and come down.
robotical adj. 1942 I. Asimov Robot AL76 Goes Astray in Amazing Stories Feb. 227/1 Austin Wilde, Robotical Engineer, turned to Sam Tobe and said, ‘Did you get anything out of the robot?’
robotical adj. 1942 I. Asimov Victory Unintentional in Super Science Stories Aug. 91/2 He [sc. a robot] added emphatically, with robotical loyalty and faith, ‘No human master could ever be like that.’
roboticist n. 1942 I. Asimov Robot AL-76 Goes Astray in Amazing Stories Feb. 223/1 There was even talk of a Congressional investigation, though every reputable Roboticist and Mathematical Physicist on Earth swore the robot was harmless.
roboticist n. 1942 I. Asimov Robot AL-76 Goes Astray in Amazing Stories Feb. 224/2 Nor, for that matter, had he any inkling of the fact that half a dozen roboticists, under the leadership of Sam Tobe, were smoking down the highway from Petersboro at better than a hundred and twenty miles an hour—for the sole purpose of having the pleasure and honor of his acquaintance.
robotics n. 1941 I. Asimov Liar! in Astounding Science-Fiction May 53/1 There’s irony in three of the greatest experts in robotics in the world falling into the same elementary trap, isn’t there?
science fictionish adj. 1940 I. Asimov Letter in Future Fiction Mar. 108 I don’t like the cover. First, it is not sufficiently science-fictionish.
space-based adj. 1956 I. Asimov Naked Sun in Astounding Science Fiction Nov. 113/1 Try getting rid of me against my will and you'll be looking down the throats of space-based artillery.
teleport v. 2 1944 I. Asimov Big & the Little in Astounding Science-Fiction Aug. 19/2 Teleported direct from the capital.