Isaac Asimov

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Isaac Asimov

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135 Quotations from Isaac Asimov

aircar n. 1946 I. Asimov Evidence in Astounding Science Fiction Sept. 136/2 Byerley brought his ‘teacher’ back the week before election. The air car dropped quickly in an obscure part of the city.
aircar n. 1982 I. Asimov Foundation’s Edge (1991) 221 There were other ground-cars moving in both directions and an occasional air-car above, but Pelorat was studying the trees.
alien adj. 1944 I. Asimov in Astounding Science Fiction Aug. 40/1 You abandoned a subject of the Foundation to torture and death at the hands of an alien mob, Mallow, and you have only five seconds to prevent the punishment due you.
areographer n. 1977 I. Asimov Mars, the Red Planet vii. 116 About 1800 a German astronomer, Johann Hieronymus Schroeter (SHROI-ter, 1745–1816), who made observations of the Martian surface, invented the term ‘areography’ (air-ee-OG-ruh-fee) from Greek words meaning ‘Mars-writing,’ to mean the description of the surface of Mars. The first real areographer was a German astronomer named Wilhelm Beer (BAYR, 1797–1850).
atmosphere suit n. 1951 I. Asimov C-Chute in Galaxy Oct. 9/2 It was my fault. You should never trust yourself with the machines of another culture. By the time someone among the Kloros could put on an atmosphere suit and get to me, it was too late to save my hands.
blaster n. 1993 I. Asimov Forward Foundation 191 A blaster, despite its name, does not ‘blast’ in the proper sense of the term. It vaporizes and blows out an interior and—if anything—causes an implosion.
carbon-based adj. 1961 I. Asimov Not As We Know It in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Sept. 91/2 But once you begin with a silicon-oxygen chain, what if the silicon atom’s capacity for hooking on to two additional atoms is filled not by more oxygen atoms but by carbon atoms, with, of course, hydrogen atoms attached. Such hybrid molecules, both silicon- and carbon-based, are the ‘silicones’.
chronoscope n. 1956 I. Asimov Dead Past in Astounding Science Fiction Apr. 8/1 You must realize, Dr. Potterley, that chronoscopy, or time-viewing, if you prefer, is a difficult process…And there is a long waiting line for the chronoscope and an even longer waiting line for the use of Multivac which guides us in our use of the controls.
chronoscopy n. 1956 I. Asimov Dead Past in Astounding Science Fiction Apr. 7/1 Mr. Araman, I came to you because you’re top man in chronoscopy…I've come to you, sir, because for two years I have been trying to obtain permission to do some time viewing—chronoscopy, that is—in connection with my researches on ancient Carthage.
chronoscopy n. 1956 I. Asimov Dead Past in Astounding Science Fiction Apr. 8/1 You must realize, Dr. Potterley, that chronoscopy, or time-viewing, if you prefer, is a difficult process…And there is a long waiting line for the chronoscope and an even longer waiting line for the use of Multivac which guides us in our use of the controls.
chronoscopy n. 1956 I. Asimov Dead Past in Astounding Science Fiction Apr. 17/1 ‘I can’t be sure yet, Caroline, but when I've got enough evidence, I'll apply for permission to use chronoscopy, which will settle the matter once and for all.’ ‘Chronoscopy?’ ‘Time-viewing. We can focus on ancient Carthage at some time of crisis, the landing of Scipio Africanus in 202 B.C., for instance, and see with our own eyes exactly what happens.’
countergravity adj. 1952 I. Asimov Currents of Space in Astounding Science Fiction Oct. 11/2 In those days, Valona would borrow a diamagnetic scooter and take him out of the village every idle day. They would skim along, a foot above the road, gliding on the cushioned smoothness of the counter-gravity field, until they were miles and miles away from any human habitation.
credit n. 1993 I. Asimov Forward Foundation 342 He had no credits to continue his work—no credits to locate others like Wanda, no credits to pay his workers on the Psychohistory Project at Streeling, no credits to set up his all-important Encyclopedia Project at the Galactic Library.
earthborn adj. 1949 I. Asimov Mother Earth in Astounding Science Fiction May 91/1 The Outer Worlders exist as they do, only because pieces of Earth have been transplanted. Soil has been brought out there; plants; animals; men. They keep themselves surrounded by an artificial Earth-born geology which has within it, for instance, those traces of cobalt, zinc, and copper which human chemistry must have. They surround themselves by Earth-born bacteria and algae which have the ability to make those inorganic traces available in just the right way and in just the right quantity.
Earth-normal adj. 1949 I. Asimov Victory Unintentional in Invasion From Mars: Interplanetary Stories 147 They had six legs apiece, stumpy and thick, designed to lift tons against two and a half times normal Earth gravity. Their reflexes were that many times Earth-normal speed, to make up for the gravity.
energy gun n. 1951 I. Asimov In Good Cause in New Tales of Space & Time 30 The babble of distant voices, the brisk crackle of energy-guns muted by distance to nearly nothingness, and the hurried click-clacking of police hoppers.
energy gun n. 1984 I. Asimov In Good Cause in Nightfall & Other Stories 181 And now there was a faint commotion, barely heard from outside the Secretariat. The babble of distant voices, the brisk crackle of energy-guns muted by distance to nearly nothingness, and the hurried click-clacking of police hoppers.
force beam n. 1974 I. Asimov Last Question in Nine Tomorrows 197 It was on a little world of its own, a spider webbing of force-beams holding the matter within which surges of sub-mesons took the place of the old clumsy molecular valves.
force field n. 1941 I. Asimov in Astounding Science Fiction Oct. 56/2 ‘The ordinary force field,’ explained Birnam, ‘is a feeble rarefied zone of energy extending over a hundred miles or more outside the ship.’
force field n. 1982 I. Asimov Foundation's Edge 3 Now it’s a colossal mausoleum, but is there a force-field ramp in the place? A slideway? A gravitic lift?—No, just these steps.
Frankenstein complex n. 1947 I. Asimov Little Lost Robot in Astounding Science Fiction Mar. 116/1 I’ll admit that this Frankenstein Complex you’re exhibiting has a certain justification—hence the First Law in the first place.
Frankenstein complex n. 1990 I. Asimov Robots I Have Known in Robot Visions 409 Mankind may know of the existence of the Three Laws on an intellectual level and yet have an ineradicable fear and distrust for robots on an emotional level. If you wanted to invent a term, you might call it a ‘Frankenstein complex.’
Frankenstein complex n. 1969 I. Asimov Feminine Intuition in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Oct. 17/1 We’ve lost the best chance U.S. Robots ever had of gaining an unbeatable public image, of overcoming the damned Frankenstein complex.
galactographer n. 1982 I. Asimov Foundation’s Edge 99 And concerning six hundred and forty thousand populated worlds there is almost no information other than their names and sometimes the location. Some galactographers have estimated that there may be up to ten thousand inhabited planets that aren’t listed at all.
galactographic adj. 1950 I. Asimov …And Now You Don't in Astounding Science Fiction Jan. 115/1 Nor were the galactographic verities of the situation lost upon Stettin.
galactography n. 1950 I. Asimov …And Now You Don’t in Astounding Science Fiction Jan. 113/2 ‘Galactography,’ said the mayor, ‘is our greatest enemy. Our admirals make no secret of our almost hopeless, strategic position.’
galactography n. 1982 I. Asimov Foundation's Edge 181 We'll decide where to go to first and there we may find the proper people to consult concerning ancient history, galactography, mythology, anthropology, or anything else you can think of.
galaxy-wide adj. 1940 I. Asimov Homo Sol in Astounding Science-Fiction Sept. 124/1 We have a race of Humanoids of a superlatively technological turn; possessing at the same time an intrinsically unscientific belief in supernatural forces, an incredibly childish predilection toward individuality, singly and in groups, and, worst of all, lack of sufficient vision to embrace a galaxy-wide culture.
genetic engineering n. 1970 I. Asimov Waterclap in Worlds of If Apr. 27 Genetic engineering…has reorganized your bones and muscles.
golden age n. 1974 I. Asimov Before Golden Age (1975) p. xiii To many science fiction readers who are now in their middle years, there was a Golden Age of Science Fiction—in capital letters. That Golden Age began in 1938, when John Campbell became editor of Astounding Stories and remolded it, and the whole field, into something closer to his heart’s desire.
gravitic adj. 1951 I. Asimov Foundation 19 The elevator was of the new sort that ran by gravitic repulsion.
gravitic adj. 1982 I. Asimov Foundation's Edge 3 Now it’s a colossal mausoleum, but is there a force-field ramp in the place? A slideway? A gravitic lift?—No, just these steps.
gravitically adv. 1982 I. Asimov Foundation's Edge 235 This time, we’ll be moving gravitically—straight up—as soon as we can be assured the atmosphere above is clear of other ships.
gravitics n. 2 1982 I. Asimov Foundation's Edge 54 I've been trained in space navigation, but not on these ships. If something goes wrong with the gravitics, I'm afraid there’s nothing I can do about it.
gravity screen n. 1983 I. Asimov in Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction Aug. 125 But suppose the spaceship has a gravity screen plastered all over its hull and that, at a particular moment, the screen is activated. Now, with no gravitation to hold it down, it is cast off from the Earth like a clod of mud from a spinning fly-wheel.
groundcar n. 1951 I. Asimov Foundation Trilogy–Foundation iii.i. 80 They've come…in a last-model ground car, the young pups.
groundcar n. 1982 I. Asimov Foundation's Edge (1991) 221 There were other ground-cars moving in both directions and an occasional air-car above, but Pelorat was studying the trees.
group mind n. 1982 I. Asimov Foundation's Edge 302 And, I take it, the group mind, so to speak, of the group consciousness is much stronger than an individual mind, just as a muscle is much stronger than an individual muscle cell.
gynoid n. 1979 I. Asimov Editorial: The Vocabulary of SF in Isaac Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine Sept. 8 Strictly speaking, an android should be an artificial device with the appearance of a male human being. One with the appearance of a female human being would be a ‘gynoid’, from the Greek word ‘gynos’ meaning ‘woman’. However, I have never seen the word ‘gynoid’ used for any artificial device of human appearance. ‘Android’ is used for artificial devices that mimic either sex—or, for that matter, that are neuter.
gyrocab n. 1951 I. Asimov Hostess in Galaxy Science Fiction May 107/2 She came upon them getting out of a gyro-cab just as she emerged from the tubes on to street level. The gyro-cabbie, wide-eyed, gazed after his fares for a moment, then hovered upward and away.
heat ray n. 1949 I. Asimov Victory Unintentional in Invasion From Mars: Interplanetary Stories 144 Definitely a heat ray of some sort.
holoscreen n. 1989 I. Asimov Nemesis (1990) 282 The holoscreen sprang to life and she could see the two suited figures on it, standing on the barren soil of Erythro.
home planet n. 1951 I. Asimov Foundation Trilogy–Foundation i. ii. 6 The air seemed a little thicker here, the gravity a bit greater, than on his home planet of Synnax.
humanoid n. 1940 I. Asimov Homo Sol in Astounding Science-Fiction Sept. 118/1 I have here…the official report from Alpha Centauri, on whose fifth planet the Humanoids of Sol have landed.
humanoid adj. 1940 I. Asimov Homo Sol in Astounding Science-Fiction Sept. 118/1 Beings of every manlike type and shape were there. Some were tall and polelike, some broad and burly, some short and stumpy. There were those with long, wiry hair, those with scanty gray fuzz covering head and face, others with thick, blond curls piled high, and still others entirely bald. Some possessed long, hair-covered trumpets of ears, others had tympanum membranes flush with their temples. There were those present with large gazellelike eyes of a deep-purple luminosity, others with tiny optics of a beady black. There was a delegate with green skin, one with an eight-inch proboscis and one with a vestigial tail. Internally, variation was almost infinite. But all were alike in two things. They were all Humanoid. They all possessed intelligence.
humanoid adj. 1940 I. Asimov Homo Sol in Astounding Science-Fiction Sept. 130/1 And I hope these learned gentlemen still react in a vaguely Humanoid way.
hyperdrive n. 1947 I. Asimov Little Lost Robot in Astounding Science-Fiction Mar. 112/1 Since the first imperfect Hyper Drive was constructed, the government has spared no effort here.
hyperspace n. 1951 I. Asimov Foundation 12 He had steeled himself just a little for the Jump through hyper-space, a phenomenon one did not experience in simple interplanetary trips. The Jump remained, and would probably remain forever, the only practical method of travelling between the stars.
hyperspatial adj. 1954 I. Asimov Foundation of S.F. Success in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Oct. 69 With a drive that’s hyperspatial, through the parsecs you will race.
hyperspatial adj. 1991 I. Asimov Forward the Foundation in Isaac Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine Nov. 53 I’ve even managed to make hyperspatial contact with some minor official.
hyperspeed n. 1969 I. Asimov Feminine Intuition in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Oct. 8/1 We can’t use the hyper-speed drive except perhaps once as a demonstration…. The Space Jump is risky; it’s fearfully prodigal of energy and therefore it’s enormously expensive.
jump n. 1945 I. Asimov in Astounding Science-Fiction Apr. 57/2 In grasshopper jumps of increasing magnitude, the trade ship was spanning the Galaxy in its return to the Foundation.
jump n. 1951 I. Asimov Foundation 12 He had steeled himself just a little for the Jump through hyper-space, a phenomenon one did not experience in simple interplanetary trips. The Jump remained, and would probably remain forever, the only practical method of travelling between the stars.
jump n. 1952 I. Asimov Currents of Space (1973) xiii. 144 It took hours to reach a point far enough from star-mass distortion of the space-fabric to make a jump possible.
jump v. 1952 I. Asimov Currents of Space in Astounding Science Fiction Oct. 67/2 It’s different in different places and we have to know exactly what it is in order to allow ships to calculate exactly how to jump through hyperspace.
Law of Robotics n. [1942 I. Asimov Runaround in Astounding Science-Fiction Mar. 100/1 Let’s start with the three fundamental rules of Robotics—the three rules that are built most deeply into a robot’s positronic brain.]
Law of Robotics n. 1954 I. Asimov Caves of Steel viii. 94 The First Law of Robotics states that a robot cannot harm a human being.
Law of Robotics n. [1941 I. Asimov Liar! in Astounding Science-Fiction May 53/2 ‘You know the fundamental law impressed upon the positronic brain of all robots, of course.’…‘Certainly…. On no conditions is a human being to be injured in any way, even when such injury is directly ordered by another human.’]
Law of Robotics n. 1944 I. Asimov Catch That Rabbit in Astounding Science Fiction Feb. 165/2 If your analysis were correct, Dave would have to break down the First Law of Robotics: That a robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to be injured.
light barrier n. 2 1981 I. Asimov Science in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Dec. 137 We broke the sound-barriers, and we’ll break the light-barrier. You scientists are just stupid and dogmatic.
light-minute n. 1945 I. Asimov Mule in Astounding Science Fiction Nov. 42/1 We traveled about a light-minute or so, in neutral, right past Horleggor.
light-second n. 1942 I. Asimov Black Friar of the Flame in Planet Stories Spring 21/2 One fleet was not two parsecs from Vega itself; another had captured Luna and hovered one light-second above the Earth.
light-year n. 1951 I. Asimov Foundation Trilogy–Foundation i.i. 5 At one time there was the cold, blue-white smoke of a gaseous nebula within five light years of the ship.
Luna n. 1939 I. Asimov in Astounding Science Fiction July 45/2 Curiously enough, there was little resentment of the fact. Men were impressed and awed; the crowd whispered and cast inquisitive glances at the dim crescent of Luna, scarcely seen in the bright sunlight. Over all, an uneasy pall of silence, the silence of indecision, lay.
Luna City n. 1957 I. Asimov Pirates of Asteroids (1980) 17 Oh, boy, it was sure nice coming in to Luna City.
Lunarite n. 1972 I. Asimov Gods Themselves (1973) III. ii. 176 After all, what can they do? They can’t infiltrate. You can’t disguise an Earthie as a Lunarite.
Mercurian adj. 1942 I. Asimov Runaround in Astounding Science Fiction Mar. 97/2 You know he’s perfectly adapted to a Mercurian environment. Heat doesn’t mean anything to him, and he’s built for the light gravity and the broken ground.
needle gun n. 1953 I. Asimov in Fantastic May—June 49/2 And I knew the needle gun was about to fire.
neutronium n. 1942 I. Asimov Black Friar of Flame in Planet Stories Spring 24/1 The treaty of Draconis has hung like neutronium around our neck these twenty years.
non-human n. 1982 I. Asimov Foundation’s Edge 284 Right now, I think that if you thought you were going to encounter nonhumans, you wouldn’t worry about having been captured…if they but gave you a little time to sate your curiosity.
non-human adj. 1982 I. Asimov Foundation's Edge 284 Janov, you want a nonhuman intelligence and you will have one.
normal space n. 1942 I. Asimov Black Friar of Flame in Planet Stories Spring 10/2 ‘Now then, you feel better. But come, in a few moments we shall leave hyper-space and we will see Sol.’ Already, even as he spoke, the thick, choking cloak of hyper-stuff that clung so closely to the sides of the Flaming Nova was going through those curious changes that marked the beginning of the shift to normal space.
nova n. 1956 I. Asimov Last Question in Science Fiction Quarterly Nov. 13/2 The Universal AC said, ‘Man’s original star has gone nova. It is a white dwarf.’
off-planet adj. 1982 I. Asimov Foundation’s Edge 194 Apparently accustomed to off-planet guests, he had smiled paternally as Trevize and Pelorat gingerly scooped at the steaming bits of meat.
outworld n. 1988 I. Asimov Prelude to Foundation 74 It is important that the officials of the Empire have some common ground, some special feeling for the Empire. And they can’t all be native Trantorians or else the Outworlds would grow restless.
outworld adj. 1982 I. Asimov Foundation’s Edge 162 By one of our outworld agents? Are such agents to be expected to stand against those with the powers we have seen demonstrated here?
outworlder n. 1982 I. Asimov Foundation's Edge 224 I forget my hospitality. You are Outworlders and it would not be fitting that you entertain me.
planetography n. 1982 I. Asimov Foundation's Edge (1983) vi. 85 Out beyond, eight parsecs away, was Anacreon, the nearest largest planet… You know its position relative to Terminus and the Galactic core; you've studied its planetography and history.
positronic adj. 1941 I. Asimov Liar! in Astounding Science Fiction May 44/1 By exact count, there are seventy-five thousand, two hundred and thirty-four operations necessary for the manufacture of a single positronic brain.
positronic adj. 1941 I. Asimov Liar! in Astounding Science Fiction May 44/1 We've produced a positronic brain of supposedly ordinary vintage that’s got the remarkable property of being able to tune in on thought waves.
positronic adj. 1956 I. Asimov Naked Sun in Astounding Science Fiction Oct. 24/2 He knew a positronic brain…nestled in the hollow of the skull. He knew that Daneel’s ‘thoughts’ were only short-lived positronic currents.
pseudo-grav n. 1952 I. Asimov Martian Way in Galaxy Science Fiction Nov. 36/1 Then you would have to hike the pseudo-grav field of your suit and come down.
pseudo-grav n. 1955 I. Asimov Talking Stone in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Oct. 109/1 Vernadsky carefully maneuvered the tank of helium on board the ship. With ship’s pseudo-grav generators shut off, it weighed virtually nothing, but it had its full mass and inertia.
psychohistorian n. 1949 I. Asimov …And Now You Don’t in Astounding Science Fiction Nov. 18/2 It is not an easy thing to be a Psychohistorian in the first place; and not even the best Psychohistorian need necessarily qualify to be a Speaker.
psychohistorian n. 1978 I. Asimov Lost Art in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Feb. 110 Back in 1950, I wrote a short story…. In it, the great psychohistorian, Hari Seldon, is about to demonstrate an important point.
psychohistorian n. 1992 I. Asimov Cleon the Emperor in Asimov’s Science Fiction Apr. 247 Seldon crossed the grounds in his passage from his office (First Minister) to his laboratory (Psychohistorian).
psychohistory n. 1951 I. Asimov Foundation Trilogy–Foundation i. i. 3 Undoubtedly his greatest contributions were in the field of psychohistory.
psychohistory n. 1942 I. Asimov Foundation in Astounding Science-Fiction May 42/1 After the Fall will come inevitable barbarism, a period which, our psychohistory tells us, should…last from thirty to fifty thousand years.
psychohistory n. 1945 I. Asimov The Mule in Astounding Science-Fiction Nov. 37/2 As I understand it, your investigations into the mathematics of psychohistory have been intended to duplicate Hari Seldon’s work and, eventually, trace the projected course of future history.
ray v. 1942 I. Asimov Black Friar of the Flame in Planet Stories Spring 18/1 Order the guns placed in readiness and aimed along the avenues. Any Human attempting to pass the cordon is to be rayed mercilessly.
ray v. 1987 I. Asimov Fantastic Voyage II: Destination Brain lxxxvii. 321 Well, for starters, I’ll say you got hold of the stunner and rayed them both, then held the stunner on me and made me take you to the airport because you didn’t know its location.
robotic adj. 1941 I. Asimov Liar! in Astounding Science-Fiction May 50 You'd cut your own nose off before you'd let me get the credit for solving robotic telepathy.
robotical adj. 1942 I. Asimov Robot AL76 Goes Astray in Amazing Stories Feb. 227/1 Austin Wilde, Robotical Engineer, turned to Sam Tobe and said, ‘Did you get anything out of the robot?’
robotical adj. 1942 I. Asimov Victory Unintentional in Super Science Stories Aug. 91/2 He [sc. a robot] added emphatically, with robotical loyalty and faith, ‘No human master could ever be like that.’
roboticist n. 1946 I. Asimov Evidence in Astounding Science Fiction Sept. 124/1 Slowly, the roboticist’s finger touched a knob and the wall illuminators glowed to gentle life.
roboticist n. 1949 I. Asimov Victory Unintentional in Invasion from Mars 147 To dispense with further description, they were indestructible, and so impressively powerful that they were the only robots ever built on whom the roboticists of the corporation had never quite had the nerve to pin a serial-number nickname.
roboticist n. 1942 I. Asimov Robot AL-76 Goes Astray in Amazing Stories Feb. 223/1 There was even talk of a Congressional investigation, though every reputable Roboticist and Mathematical Physicist on Earth swore the robot was harmless.
roboticist n. 1942 I. Asimov Robot AL-76 Goes Astray in Amazing Stories Feb. 224/2 Nor, for that matter, had he any inkling of the fact that half a dozen roboticists, under the leadership of Sam Tobe, were smoking down the highway from Petersboro at better than a hundred and twenty miles an hour—for the sole purpose of having the pleasure and honor of his acquaintance.
roboticized adj. 1957 I. Asimov Naked Sun iii. 35 A thoroughly roboticized economy.
robotics n. 1941 I. Asimov Liar! in Astounding Science-Fiction May 53/1 There’s irony in three of the greatest experts in robotics in the world falling into the same elementary trap, isn’t there?
science-fictionally adv. 1974 I. Asimov Before Golden Age 986 ‘Who Goes There?’ was eventually made into the financially successful but science fictionally contemptible motion picture The Thing, for which John was paid a mere few hundred dollars in total.
science fictionish adj. 1940 I. Asimov Letter in Future Fiction Mar. 108 I don’t like the cover. First, it is not sufficiently science-fictionish.
science fictionish adj. 1975 I. Asimov in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction June 128 It occurred to me that there is nothing so dramatic for a science-fictionish person such as myself as the Martian canals.
science fictionish adj. 1986 I. Asimov Robot Dreams xiv My robots, too, had ‘brains’ that made them work, and I never spoke of them as computers, either. I had to make them science-fictionish, of course, so I called them ‘positronic brains.’ Positrons had been detected for the first time only four years before my first robot story had been written.
sf n. 1954 I. Asimov in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Oct. 69 (title) The foundation of S.F. success.
skimmer n. 1957 I. Asimov in Astounding Science Fiction July 42/2 The skimmer landed at the roof-entry of a hotel.
slideway n. 1982 I. Asimov Foundation's Edge 3 Now it’s a colossal mausoleum, but is there a force-field ramp in the place? A slideway? A gravitic lift?—No, just these steps.
space-based adj. 1956 I. Asimov Naked Sun in Astounding Science Fiction Nov. 113/1 Try getting rid of me against my will and you'll be looking down the throats of space-based artillery.
space exploration n. 1970 I. Asimov Waterclap in World of If Apr. 24/2 To people who don’t see the purpose and the importance of space exploration the death of Moonmen in accidents is proof enough that the Moon is dangers, that its colonization is a useless fantasy.
space fleet n. 1942 I. Asimov Black Friar of Flame in Planet Stories Spring Against this oldest of all naval tactics—old even in the dim dawn of history when rival triremes had maneuvered and rammed each other to destruction with pointed prows—the super-modern equipment of a space-fleet has no defense.
space lane n. 1941 I. Asimov Not Final! in Astounding Science-Fiction Oct. 60/1 We're way off the regular space lanes. The first the System will know of us will be the landing of the Transparent on Ganymede.
spaceport n. 1951 I. Asimov Foundation Trilogy–Foundation ii. ii. 43 Anselm haut Rodric…was met by Salvor Hardin at the spaceport with all the imposing ritual of a state occasion.
spacer n. 1 1940 I. Asimov Callistan Menace in Astonishing Stories Apr. 71/2 I've read books about him. He was the greatest spacer there ever was.
spacer n. 1 1944 I. Asimov Big & the Little in Astounding Science Fiction Aug. 9/1 My grandfather was a blood-poor son-of-a-spacer who died heaving coal at starving wages before the Foundation.
spaceworthiness n. 1952 I. Asimov Space in Space Science Fiction May 78/2 The Pilot remained at his post to the actual landing, his only thought that of breaking the force of the crash, of maintaining the spaceworthiness of the vessel.
subetheric adj. 1955 I. Asimov Talking Stone in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Oct. 114/1 They're saving power, hoping they'll get picked up. Right now, they're putting everything they've got into a sub-etheric call, I'll bet.
subetherics n. 1952 I. Asimov Youth in Space Science Fiction May 76/2 In a case such as theirs, then, there was little or no chance that another ship would come within range of their subetherics except for the most improbable of coincidences.
suit n. 1966 I. Asimov in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Oct. 7/1 They took the small skim-boat back to the mother ship. They shucked their suits once on board, something Jennings at least was always glad to do.
superluminal adj. 1969 I. Asimov in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Dec. 103 An imaginary mass has no physical significance in our own subluminal Universe, so it has long been customary to dismiss superluminal velocities at once, and say that faster-than-light particles are impossible because there can be no such thing as an imaginary mass.
teleport v. 2 1944 I. Asimov Big & the Little in Astounding Science-Fiction Aug. 19/2 Teleported direct from the capital.
Tellurian n. 1965 I. Asimov Water, Water, Everywhere– in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Dec. 87 Mr. Bridges is more interested in correct usage of planetary names, rather than in mere derivations (a more useful and less frivolous involvement than mine, you see) and, for instance, advocates what he maintains to be correctly derived words such as Venustian and Hesperian for hypothetical inhabitants of Venus in place of the incorrect Venusian or Cytherean; and Tellus and Tellurian in place of Terra and Terran. He lists astronomers and classical scholars who support his views.
Tellus n. 1965 I. Asimov Water, Water, Everywhere– in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Dec. 87 Mr. Bridges is more interested in correct usage of planetary names, rather than in mere derivations (a more useful and less frivolous involvement than mine, you see) and, for instance, advocates what he maintains to be correctly derived words such as Venustian and Hesperian for hypothetical inhabitants of Venus in place of the incorrect Venusian or Cytherean; and Tellus and Tellurian in place of Terra and Terran. He lists astronomers and classical scholars who support his views.
terraformed adj. 1993 I. Asimov Forward Foundation 393 Wanda invariably found herself out here, scratching at the terraformed ground, as if coaxing a few plants to life might somehow, in some tiny measure, ameliorate her pain.
thruster n. 1951 I. Asimov C-Chute in Galaxy Oct. 31/2 The coarse adjustment was the powerful thrusters back and front which fixed final velocity by their accelerative and decelerative force.
time barrier n. 1967 I. Asimov Impossible, That’s All! in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Feb. 114 I’ve lost track of the number of letters that have reached me demanding, ‘Why can’t you go faster than light?’… ‘What makes you think that someday we won’t break the time barrier?’
time-path n. 1978 I. Asimov Fair Exchange in Asimov’s SF Adventure Magazine Fall 64/1 Did even so small a thing as the publication of Thespis set up its ripples and create an alternate time-path, and was I in that alternate time-path?
time viewer n. 1956 I. Asimov Dead Past in Astounding Science Fiction Apr. 34/2 ‘Do you have a time viewer here, Dr. Foster?’… ‘Yes, I do, Mrs. Potterley. A kind of time-viewer. Not a good one. I can’t get sound yet and the picture is darned blurry, but it works.’
ultrawave n. 1951 I. Asimov Foundation Trilogy–Foundation ii. i. 40 The news that the Terminus City ultrawave set received two hours ago.
ultrawave n. 1951 I. Asimov Foundation Trilogy–Foundation iii. vi. 122 Use the ultrawave sets there to contact other portions of the planet.
Vegan adj. 1942 I. Asimov Black Friar of Flame in Planet Stories Spring 13/1 But Earth has particular significance. It’s the center of Loarism, because the Humans originated here. It corresponds to our own Vegan system.
Vegan adj. 1943 I. Asimov Death Sentence in Astounding Science Fiction Nov. 32/1 Dorlis was great when no human had ever entered the Vegan system.
Vegan adj. 1951 I. Asimov Foundation Trilogy–Foundation iii.i.79 He had long since stopped wishing for the mild Vegan tobacco of his youth.
videophone n. 1966 I. Asimov Key in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Oct. 30/2 Ashley rose. ‘Where is your videophone?’ ‘In the next room.’
visiphone n. 1946 I. Asimov in Astounding Science Fiction Sept. 136/2 ‘Good-by’, said Quinn, with his first touch of viciousness, and the visiphone slammed off.
visiphone n. 1951 I. Asimov Foundation Trilogy–Foundation iii.ii.89 He threaded his way through the crowd at the spaceport and called up City Hall at a public visiphone.