Anthony Boucher

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Anthony Boucher

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22 Quotations from Anthony Boucher

actifan n. 1960 ‘A. Boucher’ in D. Knight In Search of Wonder Introd. p. viii, Successively or simultaneously, damon knight has been a science fiction fan, even an actifan (the uninitiated will have no trouble with that fannish word if they'll simply pronounce it aloud), an editor, a critic and a creative writer.
alternate universe n. 1950 ‘A. Boucher’ & J. F. McComas in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Dec. 104 At last the superlative magazine series by L. Sprague de Camp and Fletcher Pratt, recounting Harold Shea’s experiences with the mathematics of magic in alternate universes, is all in print in a completely revised and expanded form.
alternate world n. 1954 ‘A. Boucher’ in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Nov. 99 Beyond Earth’s Gates, by Lewis Padgett and C.L. Moore (Ace, 35¢) is a highly agreeable bit of alternate-world foolishness, in which a sympathetically unheroic hero finds himself drowning in the clichés (from the sinister highpriest [sic] to the fair princess) of the world of Malesco.
Centaurian n. 1942 ‘H. H. Holmes’ Rocket to Morgue 16 A pulsing arc of purple light grew in the middle of the room and forth from it stepped a green-bearded Centaurian.
completist n. 1954 ‘A. Boucher’ Recommended Reading in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Dec. 91 Robert Shafer’s THE CONQUERED PLACE (Putnam’s, $3.50) is a long and pretentious ‘serious novel’ on the s.f. theme of the future occupation of the U.S. by an unnamed but obviously Russian military force, and I regret to say that it fails equally as fiction and as extrapolation; for completists only.
-con suffix 1942 ‘˜H. H. Holmes’™ Rocket to Morgue 86 The next one’s here in Los Angeles, and I’m afraid it’s called the Pacificon.
elsewhen n. 1943 ‘A. Boucher’ Elsewhen in Astounding Science-Fiction Jan. 112/1 (title) Elsewhen.
fanzine n. 1942 ‘H. H. Holmes’ Rocket to Morgue 135 But infinite numbers of pulp paper scientifiction magazines and those curious mimeographed fan bulletins that are known by the portmanteau name of fanzines, a complete set of Fowler Foulkes, almost as reverently bound as Hilary’s, a goodly lot of Shiel and Stapledon.
gadget story n. 1942 ‘H. H. Holmes’ Rocket to Morgue 51 The gadget stories were more interesting. They frequently made honest attempts at forecasting scientific developments. Atomic power, stratosphere exploration, the rocket flight that so absorbs Chantrelle, all the features that may revolutionize the second half of this century as thoroughly as radio and the airplane have transformed this half—all these became familiar, workable things. But the writers stopped there. Interest lay in the gadget itself. And science fiction was headed for a blind alley until the realization came that even science fiction must remain fiction, and fiction is basically about people, not subatomic blasters nor time warps.
golden age n. 1952 ‘A. Boucher’ & J. F. McComas Recommended Reading in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Apr. 94 Of 30 books (counting the two-in-one jobs) there were 11½ novels whose book publication marked their first appearance before the public! 7 other novels were (as is normal in other fields) serialized shortly before or even simultaneously with their book publication. 8½ novels were revivals of works that first saw publication in magazines of the period 1939—1949; we're sure no one will quarrel with the permanent preservation of the best of that ‘Golden Age’ of science fiction.
mainstream adj. 1954 ‘A. Boucher’ & F. McComas Recommended Reading in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Feb. 93 In its crystal-clear prose, its intense human warmth and its depth of psychological probing, it is a first-rate ‘straight’ novel; its ingenious use of telepathy, psychokinesis and other ‘psi’ powers make it admirable science-fantasy; and the adroit plotting and ceaseless surge of action qualify it as a distinguished suspense story. Symbiotically, these factors add up to more than their sum—add up, indeed, to one of the most impressive proofs yet of the possibility of science fiction as a part of mainstream literature.
micro book n. 1943 ‘A. Boucher’ One-Way Trip in Astounding Science-Fiction Aug. 100/2 There were even microbooks in the rocket, with a small pocket-model viewer; there was hardly space for a projector.
pulp science fiction n. 1951 ‘H. H. Holmes’ Rocket to Morgue 171 The causes were two: directly, my acquaintance with the Mañana Literary Society, which existed in fact precisely (aside from murders) as it is depicted in this book; indirectly, the fact that pulp science fiction had, at that time, just reached maturity both in thinking and in writing and was at a fine ripe stage to make converts easily.
science fantasy n. 2 1955 ‘A. Boucher’ Intro. Best from Fantasy & SF (ser. 4) 7 F&SF has a broader editorial policy than most other science-fantasy publications—a policy which is, in effect, nothing more than to publish originally conceived and well-written imaginative fiction of any and every type.
science fictionish adj. 1965 ‘A. Boucher’ Criminals At Large in N.Y. Times Book Review 18 July 28/1 It has always been difficult to draw a sharply defined line between the spy novel and science fiction. There is often something science-fictionish about The Plans at stake—which is a direct reflection of reality; there is often something science-fictionish about the secrets for which real-life agents contend.
scientifiction n. 1942 ‘H. H. Holmes’ Rocket to Morgue 135 But infinite numbers of pulp paper scientifiction magazines and those curious mimeographed fan bulletins that are known by the portmanteau name of fanzines, a complete set of Fowler Foulkes, almost as reverently bound as Hilary’s, a goodly lot of Shiel and Stapledon.
somewhen adv. 1953 ‘A. Boucher’ Other Inauguration in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Mar. 7 Mei-Figner’s experiment with nuclear pile 1959. Nobody knows what became of M-F. Embarrassing discovery that power source remained chronostationary; poor M-F stranded somewhen with no return power.
space crew n. 1943 ‘A. Boucher’ One-Way Trip in Astounding Science-Fiction Aug. 87/2 ‘What I'd even like,’ Uranov went on heatedly, ‘is to work in a little propaganda at the end on this Martian business—show how a true living peace can function. You know, a sort of ‘Join the space crews and see another world’ whoozit. And, God, there is something you can get really excited about. To think of those—how many is it, near thirty now?—who've made the landing, accomplished man’s impossible dream, and died there, on a bitterer one-way trip than any criminal ever made, all because this peaceful world—’
space crew n. 1972 ‘A. Boucher’ Man's Reach in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Nov. 69/1 No space crew in history has ever mutinied, but few space crews have traveled with a contralto whose tremendous voice can fill and amphitheater—or a space liner.
timeline n. 1943 ‘A. Boucher’ Elsewhen in Astounding Science Fiction Jan. 113/1 They cannot be made to see that to move along the time line with free volitional motion, unconditioned by the relentless force that pushes mankind along at the unchanging rate of—how shall one put it—one second per second—that to do this for even one little fraction of a second was as great a miracle as to zoom spectacularly ahead to 5900 A.D.
time machine n. 1943 ‘A. Boucher’ Elsewhen in Astounding Science-Fiction Jan. 114/3 The one completely practical purpose of a short-range time machine, Mr. Partridge had suddenly realized, was to provide an alibi for murder.
time warp n. 1951 ‘H. H. Holmes’ Rocket to Morgue 54 The gadget stories were more interesting. They frequently made honest attempts at forecasting scientific developments. Atomic power, stratosphere exploration, the rocket flight that so absorbs Chantrelle, all the features that may revolutionize the second half of this century as thoroughly as radio and the airplane have transformed this half—all these became familiar, workable things. But the writers stopped there. Interest lay in the gadget itself. And science fiction was headed for a blind alley until the realization came that even science fiction must remain fiction, and fiction is basically about people, not subatomic blasters nor time warps.