Lin Carter

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Lin Carter

See first quotes from Lin Carter

22 Quotations from Lin Carter

adult fantasy n. 1970 L. Carter Introduction: Mānā-Yood-Sushāi in At Edge of World x I have left many marvelous dreams alone, for if this book sells successfully, there may be another volume in the Ballantine Adult Fantasy series drawn from the dreams of Mānā-Yood-Sushāi.
annish n. 1966 L. Carter Handy Phrase-Book in Fannish in Worlds of If Oct. 66/2 The editor of a fan magazine is a ‘faned.’ If you belong to F.A.P.A. (Fantasy Amateur Press Association) you publish a fapazine, and you are a fapan. If your fanzine lasts a year (many don’t) you put out a particularly large Anniversary Issue called ‘the Annish.’
asterite n. 1988 L. Carter Ghosts of Ganymede in Astro-Adventures Jan. 11/2 ‘Find anything, chief?’ inquired the Venusian when he was finished. Star shrugged. ‘Nothing, really,’ he said, rather ruefully. ‘The pearls have no magnetic charge, are not radioactive—outside of their unexpected weight, there’s nothing odd about them except their rarity. Mineralogy knows nothing of such stones... only the lost Asterites mined them, I guess.’
Bradburian adj. 1951 L. Carter Letter in Startling Stories July 139 Sam Merwin’s Short Order had a very surprising, rather Bradburian ending that left me numb.
completism n. 1966 L. Carter Science-Fiction Fanways in Worlds of If Nov. 48/1 Completism sometimes strikes an aged or elderly fan. You never know just when the condition may arise. There you are, going merrily along reading and collecting the science-fiction magazines and purchasing an occasional hardcover book…and all of a sudden your eyes glaze, your hands begin to twitch with uncontrollable greed…and you realize you yearn to have EVERYTHING in your collection. Every single sf paperback and hardcover ever published…a copy of every single issue of every single last science-fiction or fantasy magazine ever printed, in America or England or wherever…gakk! You are a Completist. [all ellipses in orig.]
epic fantasy n. 1969 L. Carter Azlon in Young Magicians 262 It is my theory that the so-called epic fantasy, or imaginary world fiction, basically employs either one of two basic plot-themes, or a combination of the two.
faan n. 1966 L. Carter Handy Phrase-Book in Fannish in Worlds of If Oct. 66/2 The noisy teen-aged fan with the helicopter beanie and collection of BNF autographs…[is] called a faaan.
fanmag n. 1966 L. Carter Handy Phrase-Book in Fannish in If Oct. 67/1 Or suppose you chance to belong to a very large, very old organization called The National Fantasy Fan Federation. The name itself has been abbreviated down to ‘the NFFF’ or ‘the N3F.’ You are referred to as a Neffer. If you publish a fanmag distributed to members only, it’s a Neffzine.
fanne n. 1966 L. Carter Handy Phrase Book in Fannish in Worlds of If Oct. 66/1 A female fan (oh, yes, there are such) is generally a fanne.
fanzine n. 1966 L. Carter Handy Phrase-Book in Fannish in Worlds of If Oct. 66/1 Fan magazines themselves are called fanzines (the word was coined by Louis Russell Chauvenet) or fanmags—and the plural is ‘fmz’, but don’t ask me how you pronounce it, because you don’t.
galactographer n. 1970 L. Carter Star Rogue i. 20 For to open up another galaxy, even a small one like the G.M.C., is colossal. Think of the man-power needed for such a project. Think of the varieties of man-power—hundreds of sciences were involved. You would need pilots, galactographers, linguists, communications experts, engineers, planetographers, telepathicists, diplomats, government representatives, diovonicists, doctors, naval personnel, tacticians, biologists, ecologists, and just about every other kind of ologist you could think of.
galactographic adj. 1966 L. Carter Crown of Stars in Worlds of Tomorrow Nov. 21/1 What did the numbers mean? ‘107-A-sM.’ It was not a phone number, or a homing-system wavelength, and certainly not a set of galactographic coordinates.
Heinleinian adj. 1956 L. Carter Inside Books in Inside & Science Fiction Advertiser (#14) Mar. 24 Here is ‘The Battle’, a theological story such as Tony Boucher writes; the charming satire ‘Skulking Permit’; the Heinleinian ‘A Ticket to Tranai’, and others.
heroic fantasy n. 1973 L. Carter Imaginary Worlds 66 The kind of story Howard created with his Conan yarns, and which C. L. Moore imitated with her tales of Jirel, we call ‘Sword & Sorcery’ today. The term, however, was not coined until long after the new sub-branch of heroic fantasy appeared. It was, in fact, coined by Fritz Leiber (himself probably the finest living writer of Sword & Sorcery) as recently as 1961. The British writer Michael Moorcock had published an open letter in the amateur magazine Amra, asking for ideas on a name for the sub-genre, his own suggestion being ‘epic fantasy’. Leiber suggested ‘Sword & Sorcery’, an obvious derivation from such terms as ‘blood and thunder’ and ‘cloak and dagger’. His response first appeared in another ‘fanzine’—as amateur periodicals are called in the sub-world of fantasy and science fiction enthusiasts—a publication called Ancalagon, and was reprinted in the issue of Amra dated July 1961. Although some prefer ‘heroic fantasy’, as being more dignified and literary and a few employ a variant, ‘swordplay-and-sorcery,’ the term ‘Sword & Sorcery’ caught on and is now generally accepted.
insectoid n. 1973 L. Carter Black Legion of Callisto 198 CAPOK: an impolite colloquialism by which the baser elements of the various human races of Thanator refer, derogatorily, to the Yathoon insectoids; cognate to ‘bug’.
letterhack n. 1966 L. Carter Handy Phrase-Book in Fannish in Worlds of If Oct. 66/2 If your ‘fanac’ (activities in science-fiction fandom) are confined largely to reading fanzines and submitting LoC’s (letters of comment), you are likely to be sneered at as a ‘letterhack.’
Loonie n. 1970 L. Carter Star Rogue 131 Same thing happened later in the same century, when Luna, the satellite of Sol III, was settled. The colonists were indignant to the point of being ferocious about being called ‘Loonies’.
pseudopod n. 1968 L. Carter & L. S. de Camp Conan and the Cenotaph in Worlds of Fantasy Sept. 76/2 As Conan, frozen with horror, watched, the dweller on the top of the monolith sent a trickle of jelly groping down the shaft toward him. The slippery pseudopod slithered over the smooth surface of the stone. Conan began to understand the source of the stains that discolored the face of the monolith.
science fantasy n. 3 1950 L. Carter Letter in Thrilling Wonder Stories Oct. 146/1 Best news in aeons is the Return of Hankuttner in the next issue! Hope it’s another bang-up science-fantasy for a change. Kutt hasn’t given us a really good one since THE TIME AXIS.
sercon n. 1966 L. Carter Handy Phrase-Book in Fannish in Worlds of If Oct. 66/2 Let’s suppose your fan activities are confined to writing scholarly treatises on the Sources Used by H.P. Lovecraft in creating his Cthulhu Mythos…or dull articles on fannish history…. In this case, you may very well be dismissed as an eggheady old Sercon.
subgenre n. 1973 L. Carter Imaginary Worlds 66 The kind of story Howard created with his Conan yarns, and which C. L. Moore imitated with her tales of Jirel, we call ‘Sword & Sorcery’ today. The term, however, was not coined until long after the new sub-branch of heroic fantasy appeared. It was, in fact, coined by Fritz Leiber (himself probably the finest living writer of Sword & Sorcery) as recently as 1961. The British writer Michael Moorcock had published an open letter in the amateur magazine Amra, asking for ideas on a name for the sub-genre, his own suggestion being ‘epic fantasy’. Leiber suggested ‘Sword & Sorcery’, an obvious derivation from such terms as ‘blood and thunder’ and ‘cloak and dagger’. His response first appeared in another ‘fanzine’—as amateur periodicals are called in the sub-world of fantasy and science fiction enthusiasts—a publication called Ancalagon, and was reprinted in the issue of Amra dated July 1961. Although some prefer ‘heroic fantasy’, as being more dignified and literary and a few employ a variant, ‘swordplay-and-sorcery,’ the term ‘Sword & Sorcery’ caught on and is now generally accepted.
sword and sorcery n. 1973 L. Carter Imaginary Worlds 66 The kind of story Howard created with his Conan yarns, and which C. L. Moore imitated with her tales of Jirel, we call ‘Sword & Sorcery’ today. The term, however, was not coined until long after the new sub-branch of heroic fantasy appeared. It was, in fact, coined by Fritz Leiber (himself probably the finest living writer of Sword & Sorcery) as recently as 1961. The British writer Michael Moorcock had published an open letter in the amateur magazine Amra, asking for ideas on a name for the sub-genre, his own suggestion being ‘epic fantasy’. Leiber suggested ‘Sword & Sorcery’, an obvious derivation from such terms as ‘blood and thunder’ and ‘cloak and dagger’. His response first appeared in another ‘fanzine’—as amateur periodicals are called in the sub-world of fantasy and science fiction enthusiasts—a publication called Ancalagon, and was reprinted in the issue of Amra dated July 1961. Although some prefer ‘heroic fantasy’, as being more dignified and literary and a few employ a variant, ‘swordplay-and-sorcery,’ the term ‘Sword & Sorcery’ caught on and is now generally accepted.