Poul Anderson

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Poul Anderson

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173 Quotations from Poul Anderson

aircar n. 1958 P. Anderson We Have Fed Our Sea in Astounding Science Fiction Aug. 13/1 Down at the landing was a modern shelter for a sailboat, a family submarine, and a battered aircar.
Alpha Centaurian adj. 1988 P. Anderson Iron in L. Niven et al. Man-Kzin Wars (1989) v. 48 The quartermaster was showing her around while Rover moved up the Alpha Centaurian gravity well.
alternative history n. 1998 P. Anderson Blurb in H. Turtledove How Few Remain (unpaginated, before title page), Harry Turtledove has established himself as the grand master of the alternative history form… How Few Remain is perhaps his best so far.
alternative reality n. 1994 P. Anderson Stars are also Fire 97 When reaction to the War Strike doomed mighty Fireball, the end of separatist Luna was in sight, however long a delaying campaign Niolente and her cohorts might wage. Yet, in some hypothetical quantum-mechanical alternative reality—
Anglic n. 1950 P. Anderson & G. Dickson Trespass! in Fantastic Stories Quarterly Spring 133/2 I be—are—am trying to talkest archaic Anglic—Englishk—for the benefit of the Dark Age mind.
Anglic n. 1952 P. Anderson Star Plunderer in Planet Stories Sept. 58/2 A barbarian who spoke some Anglic bellowed at us to strip.
Anglic n. 1960 P. Anderson Plague of Masters in Fantastic Dec. 10/2 He regarded Flandry for several seconds before speaking, in archaic and thickly accented Anglic: ‘Welcome to Unan Besar.’
asterite n. 1964 ‘W. P. Sanders’ Sunjammer in Analog Apr. 17/1 He was a third-generation asterite, a gaunt, crease-cheeked, prematurely balding man who remembered too well the brother he had lost in the revolution.
astrogational adj. 1959 P. Anderson Virgin Planet iii. 23 He had intended to study advanced astrogational theory.
avian n. 1961 P. Anderson Day After Doomsday in Galaxy Mag. Dec. 15/2 He went over and took the avian in his arms. The beaked, crested head rested on the man’s breast and the body shuddered.
avian n. 1962 P. Anderson Day After Doomsday in Galaxy Mag. Feb. 147 He pointed out a cluster of buildings, tall garishly colored cylinders erected in steel and plastic, half a mile off the road. The avians walking between them wore embroidered jackets over their feathers.
avian adj. 1961 P. Anderson Day After Doomsday in Galaxy Mag. Dec. 13/2 Yeh, he thought, they’re for sure prettier than humans, but you have to see them to realize it. About five feet tall, the short avian body was balanced on two stout yellow legs. The arms, thinner and weaker than humans, ended in hands whose three fingers, four-jointed and mutually opposed, were surprisingly dextrous. The head, atop a long thick neck, was large and round, with a hooked beak. A throat pouch produced a whole orchestra of sounds, even labials. But all you could really convey in words was the intense blueness of the feathers, the white plumage of tail and crest.
avian adj. 1965 P. Anderson Trader Team in Analog Science Fiction/Science Fact Aug. 128/1 The monarch inclined his avian head.
avian adj. 1965 P. Anderson Trader Team in Analog Science Fiction/Science Fact July 38/1 Torches guttering in sconces threw an uneasy light—dim and red to Adzel, bright to a native—on sleazy garments, avian faces, unwinking eyes.
biotechnician n. 1951 P. Anderson Inside Earth in Galaxy Science Fiction Apr. 17/1 The biotechnicians had been very thorough. I was already a little undersized, which meant that my height and build were suitable—I could pass for a big Earthling. And of course my face and hands and so on were all right, the Earthlings being a remarkably humanoid race. But the technicians had had to remodel my ears, blunting the tips and grafting on lobes and cutting the muscles that move them. My crest had to go and a scalp covered with revolting hair was now on the top of my skull.
biotechnician n. 1963 P. Anderson Territory in Analog Science Fact–Science Fiction June 53/1 ‘How long you been here, anyways?’ ‘Myself, about a year, as a biotechnician.’
biotechnician n. 1970 P. Anderson Tau Zero (1973) 28 She was a Canadian, a bio-technician in the organocycle department.
countergravity adj. 1967 P. Anderson Outpost of Empire in Galaxy Magazine Dec. 69/1 The engines driving that enormous mass were deathly quiet. But where their countergravity fields touched the planet, trees snapped to kindling and the lake roiled white.
dayside n. 1957 P. Anderson Life Cycle in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction July 55/2 But damn it, there’s Dayside life, too. Life that never comes into Twilight.
dayside n. 1957 P. Anderson Life Cycle in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction July 65/2 Male and female had to come from the same race, evolving together—they couldn’t have arisen separately, one in the hell of Dayside and one in the endless purgatorial dusk of Twilight.
dayside n. 1993 P. Anderson Harvest of Stars (1994) 1 We will not shelter our awareness on dayside.
dimension n. 1979 P. Anderson Gate of Flying Knives in I. Asimov et al. Mammoth Book of Short Fantasy Novels (1986) 20 Philosophers of a later, more rationalistic era elaborated this into a theory of parallel universes. My own researches—you will understand that my condition has made me especially interested in the theory of dimensions, the subtler aspects of geometry—my own researches have demonstrated the possibility of transference between these different spaces.
downtime adv. 1972 P. Anderson There Will Be Time (1973) 51 He would take certain stamps and coins uptime and sell them to dealers; he would go downtime with a few aluminum vessels, which were worth more than gold.
dropshaft n. 1962 P. Anderson Day After Doomsday in Galaxy Mag. Feb. viii. 132/1 They went down a dropshaft to a tunnel.
dropshaft n. 1976 P. Anderson Star Plunderer in B. W. Aldiss Galactic Empires Volume One 60 Beyond the desk, a Gorzuni played a hose on us, washing off blood and grime, and then we were herded down the long corridors and by way of wooden ladders (the drop-shafts and elevators weren’t working it seemed) to the cells.
dropshaft n. 1955 P. Anderson Long Way Home in Astounding Science Fiction May 119/1 Down a drop-shaft, falling like autumn leaves, Chanthavar testing each exit as he passed it.
earthlike adj. 1948 P. Anderson Genius in Astounding Science Fiction Dec. 28/2 There are three control stations, Earth-like planets where ordinary human types were left, and from them we're getting valuable information on the path which terrestrial history actually took.
earthling n. 1950 P. Anderson Star Ship in Planet Stories Oct. 74/1 There’d been Earthling girls; and not a few Khazaki women had been intrigued by the big Terrestrial.
earthman n. 1957 P. Anderson & G. R. Dickson Earthman’s Burden 13 The first Earthmen had been met with eager admiration by the Hoka tribe near whose village they landed.
Earthside adj. 1993 P. Anderson Harvest of Stars (1994) 8 She'd paid little attention, for Earthside she mainly associated with company people on company property.
Earth-type adj. 1 1950 P. Anderson Star Ship in Planet Stories Fall 72/2 Its walls were manned by more fighters than that, and there were the terrible Earth-type guns as well.
Earth-type adj. 2 1957 P. Anderson & G. R. Dickson Earthman’s Burden 8 We thought we’d look in and check on conditions, as well as resting ourselves on an Earth-type world.
elsewhen adv. 1965 P. Anderson Corridors of Time in Amazing Stories May 55/2 Warden forces are concentrated elsewhen. We maintain only a few agents like myself in this century.
elsewhen adv. 1953 P. Anderson Three Hearts & Three Lions in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Oct. 84 (synopsis of previous part) His world suddenly exploded, and he awoke elsewhere and elsewhen.
empathy n. 1966 P. Anderson Ensign Flandry in Amazing Stories Oct. 39/2 I can be equipped with electromagnetic sensors and transducers, to feel out a hidden circuit. In addition, I have developed an empathy with machines. I can be aware, on a level below consciousness, of what they are about to do, and adjust my behavior accordingly. It is analogous to my former perception, the normal one, of nuances in expression, tone, stance on the part of fellow Merseians whom I knew intimately.
empathy n. 1974 P. Anderson Day of Their Return iii. 26 I could never read your mind; that is impossible unless I have known a person long and well, and then I can merely translate surface thoughts, clearly formulated. I cannot project…Shall we say I have a minor gift of empathy?
empathy n. [1955 P. Anderson Long Way Home June 151/1 In the case of Holat, the development was unique—the animal could not only receive the nervous impulses of others, but could at short range induce them. This was the basis of Holatan emotional empathy.]
face plate n. 1954 P. Anderson Big Rain in Astounding Science-Fiction 26/2 He took a curved stone and spat on it and began scouring his faceplate to remove the accumulated scratches in its hard plastic.
farside n. 1958 P. Anderson We Have Fed Our Sea in Astounding Science Fiction Aug. 24/2 ‘You must go to the Moon quite often.’… Maclaren nodded. ‘Mount Ambarzumian Observatory, on Farside.’
faster-than-light adj. 1948 P. Anderson Genius in Astounding Science Fiction Dec. 25/1 They'll know the principles of the star drive in a few more generations, and invent a faster-than-light engine almost at once!
flitter n. 1993 P. Anderson Harvest of Stars (1994) 40 The view from the roof bore comparison with what he saw from his flitter before he landed…
force field n. 1970 P. Anderson Tau Zero (1973) 85 The reason is, as you've been told, at high speeds we must have the force fields of one system or the other to shield us from interstellar gas.
force field n. 1988 P. Anderson Iron in L. Niven et al. Man-Kzin Wars (1989) xxii. 169 Ominously aglow, the molten mass dwarfed the spacecraft that toiled meters ahead of it; yet Sun Defier, harnessed by her own forcefield, was a plowhorse dragging it bit by bit from its former path…
force screen n. 1960 P. Anderson High Crusade (1982) viii. 48 Soon the Wersgorix landed many ships in a circular formation… to form a cap walled by the eerie faint shimmer of a force screen, picketed by mobile bombards, and roofed by hovering warcraft.
galactic n. 1 1954 P. Anderson Chapter Ends in Dynamic Science Fiction Jan. 19/1 You couldn’t call them stagnant. Their life was too healthy, their civilization too rich in its own way—folk art, folk music, ceremony, religion, the intimacy of family life which the Galactics had lost—for that term. But to one who flew between the streaming suns, it was a small existence.
gee n. 2 1951 P. Anderson Tiger by the Tail in Planet Stories Jan. 40/2 He was humanoid to a high degree, perhaps somewhat stockier than Terrestrial average—and come to think of it, the artificial gravity was a little higher than one gee—and with very white skin, long tawny hair and beard, and oblique violet eyes.
gee n. 2 1970 P. Anderson Tau Zero (1973) 26 Elsewhere, the sole direct proof of motion that those had who lay in their cabins was a return of weight. It was not much, under one tenth gee, but it gave them an ‘up’ and ‘down’ for which their bodies were grateful.
genetic engineer n. 1954 P. Anderson Big Rain in Astounding Science Fiction Oct. 22/2 Meanwhile giant pulverizers were reducing barren stone and sand to fine particles which would be mixed with fertilizers to yield soil; and the genetic engineers were evolving still other strains of life which could provide a balanced ecology; and the water units were under construction.
genetic engineering n. 1955 P. Anderson Long Way Home in Astounding Science Fiction Apr. 27 We've done things which I believe were unknown in your time: gravity control, genetic engineering, making Mars and Venus and the Jovian moons habitable.
gravitics n. 2 1997 P. Anderson Fleet of Stars (1998) 26 The ship wasn’t big, and her mass tanks were nearly empty, but probably optics were registering her, and maybe, by now, gravitics.
gravity drive n. 1950 P. Anderson Star Ship in Planet Stories Fall 73/2 None of them had ever built a rocketship, had ever seen one in action even. It was centuries obsolete in Galactic civilization. But gravity drives were out of the question. So—they’d had to design the ship from the ground up.
gravity well n. [1957 P. Anderson Life Cycle in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction July 53/2 He was the pilot and engineer, the only other Terrestrial on Mercury. When you dove this far down into the sun’s monstrous gravitational well, you couldn’t take a big crew along. ]
gravity well n. 1963 ‘W. P. Sanders’ Industrial Revolution in Analog Science Fact/Science Fiction Sept. 22/1 It’s actually harder to maintain human-type conditions on so big a mass, with a useless atmosphere around you, than on a lump in space like this. And the gravity wells are so deep.
gravity well n. 1955 P. Anderson Snows of Ganymede in Startling Stories Winter 52/1 They were aiming only to get off a small world with negligible air resistance, and not even to leave its gravity well entirely.
home star n. 1951 P. Anderson Interloper in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Apr. 5 My home star lies clear across the Galaxy, near the periphery; I will not at present be more specific than that.
home star n. 1965 P. Anderson Trader Team in Analog Science Fiction–Science Fact July 10/1 Westward in a deep purplish sky, the sun stood at eternal late afternoon. It was a K0 dwarf, barely one-tenth as luminous as man’s home star, furnace red.
humanoid adj. 1965 P. Anderson Agent of Terran Empire 1 The chilling realization came that he was not aboard a human ship. Humanoid, yes, from the size and design of things, but no vessel ever built within the borders of the Empire, and no foreign make that he knew of.
hyperdrive n. 1949 P. Anderson & J. Gergen Entity in Astounding Science Fiction June 62/1 If they had had the hyperdrive that far back, they would have visited the Sol sector by now.
hyperdrive n. 1971 P. Anderson A Little Knowledge in Analog Science Fiction/Science Fact Aug. 108/2 After all, with the hyperdrive opening endless wonders to them, spacefarers tended to choose the most obviously glamorous.
insectoid n. 1957 P. Anderson Life Cycle in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction July 55/2 Or consider one of the small insectoids I studied. It breeds here in the usual manner, then the female crawls out into the light to lay her eggs.
insectoid n. 1983 P. Anderson & G. R. Dickson Napoleon Crime in Analog Science Fiction/Science Fact Mar. 49/2 A creature the size of his thumb fluttered clumsily, ever closer to him. Multiple legs brushed his skin again. ‘Damn,’ he mumbled, and once more made futile swatting motions. The insectoid was as persistent as a terrestrial fly.
ion drive n. 1970 P. Anderson Tau Zero (1973) 25 The ion drive came to life. No man could have gone behind its thick shielding to watch it and survived.
laser rifle n. 1966 P. Anderson Door to Anywhere in Galaxy Magazine Dec. 23/1 The Iranian reached back into the locker and got a pair of laserifles.
light n. 1 1960 P. Anderson Eve Times Four in Fantastic Science Fiction Stories Apr. 79/2 But the top secondary speed of this boat is about 500 lights. The ship is going nearly 2,000: we don’t share that any longer, now when we're out of its drive field.
light-month n. 1960 P. Anderson Burning Bridge in Astounding Science Fiction Jan. 111/2 In the course of that period, we covered not quite one-and-a-half light-months.
light-week n. 1960 P. Anderson Burning Bridge in Astounding Science Fiction Jan. 100/1 Nevertheless that pencil must scrawl broadly over the sky, and for a long time, merely hoping to write on its target. For when distances are measured in light-weeks, the smallest errors grow monstrous.
light-year n. 1960 P. Anderson High Crusade (1982) v. 32 This empire filled a rough sphere in space, about two thousand light-years across.
Luna n. 1970 P. Anderson Tau Zero (1973) 19 He entered kindergarten two years before the first maser messages from it reached Farside Station on Luna.
Luna n. 1993 P. Anderson Harvest of Stars (1994) 238 It left the ship in the vicinity of Earth, the ship probably being bound for Luna.
Lunarian n. 1993 P. Anderson Harvest of Stars (1994) 6 Right now the very Lunarians were in her mind more akin to her than these fellow citizens.
Lunarian adj. 1993 P. Anderson Harvest of Stars (1994) 372 Watched from afar through the opticals of a Lunarian monitor, they showed only by the corposant glimmers astern how they hurtled under drive.
Lunarite n. 1957 P. Anderson Brake in Astounding Science Fiction Aug. 30/2 The Lunarite alone had the piloting skill to pull off the crazy stunt which was their final hope.
megayear n. 1963 P. Anderson Territory in Analog Science Fact-Science Fiction June 64/2 Now humans, the experts tell me, got started way back when, as ground apes that turned carnivore when the forests shrank up in Africa for lots of megayears.
micro book n. 1950 P. Anderson Gypsy in Astounding Science-Fiction Jan. 70/1 Einar…was nine years old and getting interested in the microbooks we had from the Traveler—and so, ultimately, from Earth.
nanomachine n. 1993 P. Anderson Harvest of Stars (1994) 424 At the fringes, robots trundled with their loads from a dome wherein humus was being synthesized, to work it into the rock that nanomachines had reduced to mineral grains.
nanotech adj. 1993 P. Anderson Harvest of Stars (1994) 442 We can’t continue sending our robots and our nanotech molecules scurrying around to find out whatever’s going wrong and repair the damage.
needle v. 1957 P. Anderson Brake in Astounding Science Fiction Aug. 10/2 Quickly, now, go to my cabin. I shall be behind, If necessary I will needle you and drag you there.
needle gun n. 1965 P. Anderson Trader Team in Analog Science Fiction/Science Fact July 44/1 Transceiver and taper in one hand, a ladylike needle gun at her waist, were all she needed.
New Wave n. 1990 P. Anderson Beer Mutterings in Thrust Winter 16/1 To the best of my knowledge, it was first said by Robert Heinlein, whose contributions to science fiction were rather more significant than those of the New Wave.
non-human n. 1952 P. Anderson Star Plunderer in Planet Stories Sept. 58/1 I groaned at that thought and tried desperately to assure myself that Kathryn’s technical knowledge would keep her in the possession of a nonhuman.
nonhumanoid adj. 1951 P. Anderson Inside Earth in Galaxy Science Fiction Apr. 19/1 Then there were other races, blue-skinned Vegans, furry Proximans, completely non-humanoid Sirians and Antarians.
nova v. 1954 P. Anderson Lord of Thousand Suns in D. A. Wollheim Tales of Outer Space 84 And from study of the reports I even thought I knew about what and where it would be: one of the weapons that had novaed suns, a million years ago.
outworlder n. 1952 P. Anderson Star Plunderer in Planet Stories Sept. 56/2 I don’t fancy life as the slave of a barbarian outworlder…though humans with technical training are much in demand and usually fairly well treated.
outworlder n. 1990 P. Anderson Inconstant Star in L. Niven et al. Man-Kzin Wars III (1992) ii. 174 Commercial and cultural as well as political center, it was bound to draw an undue share of outworlders and their influence.
planetary engineer n. 1955 P. Anderson Snows of Ganymede in Startling Stories Winter 52/1 A Planetary Engineer had training for his profession such as had never been seen before.
planet-bound adj. 1951 P. Anderson Tiger by Tale in Planet Stories Jan. 40/2 That wasn’t too surprising, since the Terrestrial Empire and the half-dozen other civilized states in the known Galaxy ruled over several thousands of intelligent races and had some contact with nobody knew how many thousands more. Many of the others were, of course, still planet-bound, but quite a few tribes along the Imperial borders had mastered a lot of human technology without changing their fundamental outlook on things.
planetfall n. 1970 P. Anderson Tau Zero (1973) 17 Housings for the two boats that would make the planet-falls for which she herself was not designed.
planetless adj. 1962 P. Anderson Day After Doomsday in Galaxy Feb. 134/2 We sha-Terra don’t threaten anybody. We're alone, planetless.
planetographer n. 1961 P. Anderson Day After Doomsday in Galaxy Mag. dec. 10/2 Kunz the astronomer and Easterling the planetographer were still hunched over their instruments, as if they would find some misfunction that would give the lie to what they could see with unaided eyes.
planetography n. 1955 P. Anderson Long Way Home in Astounding Science Fiction Apr. 39/1 Spent a hundred years external time knocking around, till I got a chance to make a comeback. Planetography’s a sort of hobby with me, which is the only reason I come to your parties, Valti, you kettle-bellied old fraud. Tell me, captain, did you ever touch at Procyon?
planetside adv. 1978 P. Anderson Avatar (1981) 270 ‘No, you went planetside.’ ‘Precisely because I am an expendable.’
pressor beam n. 1956 P. Anderson Margin of Profit in Astounding Science Fiction Sept. 58/1 A pressor beam lashed out, an invisible hammerblow of repulsion, five times the strength of the enemy tractor.
prime directive n. 1956 P. Anderson Live Coward in Astounding Science Fiction June 111/1 All of a sudden the Prime Directive was repealed… ‘Under no circumstances whatever may the Patrol or any unit thereof kill any intelligent being.’
pseudo-grav n. 1960 P. Anderson Eve Times Four in Fantastic Science Fiction Stories Apr. 86/2 Presently a thin keening sounded through the walls. It became a roar, and Teresina felt waves of frictional heat. Pseudograv could not smooth out all the jerking and buffeting which rocked the boat.
pseudogravitational adj. 1956 P. Anderson Margin of Profit in Astounding Science Fiction Sept. 51/1 But the hyperdrive vibrations can be detected a light-year away if you have sensitive instruments—pseudogravitational pulses of infinite velocity.
pseudogravity n. 1960 P. Anderson Eve Times Four in Fantastic Science Fiction Stories Apr. 78/1 Steadiness came again. Pseudogravity made a floor.
psionics n. 1960 P. Anderson Martyr in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Mar. 6/2 Our independent research has taught us just enough about psionics to show we can’t imagine its potentialities.
ramscoop n. 1989 P. Anderson Boat of Million Years (1990) 500 When it was safely away, robots went outside. Flitting around the hull, they deployed the latticework of ramscoop and fire chamber. By this time, low boost under torch drive had built up a considerable speed.
ringwall n. 1993 P. Anderson Harvest of Stars (1994) 139 The train climbed Tycho’s ringwall, swooped down again, whizzed across the crater floor, and plunged underground near Skyview Tower.
robo- prefix 1949 P. Anderson Double-Dyed Villains in Astounding Science Fiction Sept. 27/1 Even if that population were completely uniform, the sheer complexity of administrative detail is inconceivable—why, if all government services from legislators to postmen added up to only one percent of the total, and no government has ever been that efficient, that would be some ten to the thirteenth individual beings in government! Robocomputers help some, but not much.
robotically adv. 1 1971 P. Anderson Byworlder in Fantastic Science Fiction & Fantasy Stories June ii. 15/2 Besides, he’s robotically correct.… He’s simply not cheerful company. Under that stiff surface he’s too tense.
rocket-ship n. 1950 P. Anderson Star Ship in Planet Stories Fall 73/2 None of them had ever built a rocketship, had ever seen one in action even. It was centuries obsolete in Galactic civilization. But gravity drives were out of the question.
sailship n. 1964 ‘W. P. Sanders’ Sunjammer in Analog Apr. 19/2 The messages which drew a herdship off her path had always been automatic: beeps from a sailship whose interior sensors had registered trouble.
sapient adj. 2000 P. Anderson Genesis 161 Besides fellow humans he worked closely with sapient machines, and some of them got to be friends too, of an eerie kind.
sentience n. 1 1954 P. Anderson Brain Wave xx. 120 Corinth’s memory went back over what he had seen, the mountains and oceans and forests of whole worlds, the life which blossomed in splendor or struggled only to live, and the sentience which had arisen to take blind nature in hand.
sentience n. 2 1973 P. Anderson Lodestar in John W. Cambell Memorial Anthology 16 Already it had shrunk in his vision to a ball, swirled blue and white: a body as big and fair as Earth ever was, four or five billion years in the making, uncounted swarms of unknown life-forms, sentiences and civilizations, histories and mysteries, become a marble in a game…or a set of entries in a set of data banks, for profit or loss, in a few cities a hundred or more light-years remote.
shield n. 1962 P. Anderson Shield in Fantastic Stories of Imagination June 62/2 Momentum carried him a fractional inch into it. Then his kinetic energy had been absorbed, taken up by the field itself and shunted to the power pack. As for the noise, none could penetrate the shield.
shield n. 1962 P. Anderson Shield in Fantastic Stories of Imagination June 63/2 The shield unit dragged at his shoulders; ten pounds added up like fury when you were exhausted.
Singularity n. 1990 P. Anderson Inconstant Star in L. Niven et al. Man-Kzin Wars III (1992) x. 241 Burnt out, a giant star collapses into a form so dense, infinite dense at the core singularity, that light itself can no longer escape its grip.
slideway n. 1968 P. Anderson Satan's World in Analog Science Fiction/Science Fact May 30/2 The slideways were too slow for her. She bounded along them.
slugthrower n. 1978 P. Anderson Avatar (1981) 89 Each had a holstered sidearm: slugthrower, not stunner.
slugthrower n. 1962 P. Anderson Progress in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Jan. 119/1 Alisabeta crouched in the starboard slugthrower turret.
soft science fiction n. 1998 P. Anderson Ideas for Science Fiction in Writer Sept. 24/2 In my opinion, two streams run through science fiction. The first traces back to Jules Verne. It is ‘the idea as hero’. His tales are mainly concerned with the concept—a submarine, a journey to the center of the planet, and so on. The second derives from H.G. Wells. His own ideas were brilliant, but he didn’t care how implausible they might be, an invisible man or a time machine or whatever. He concentrated on the characters, their emotions and interactions. Today, we usually speak of these two streams as ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ science fiction.
Solarian n. 2 1952 P. Anderson Captive of Centaurianess in Planet Stories Mar. 23/1 I thought you vere too, but it seems like you Solarians are more backvard than I supposed.
Solarian n. 2 1955 P. Anderson Long Way Home in Astounding Science Fiction July 146/1 The Solarians are going to be on us in a minute. I like them even less than you, so let’s settle our own differences later, shall we?
Sol III n. 1949 P. Anderson Double-Dyed Villains in Astounding Science Fiction Sept. 8/1 Wing Alak of Sol III…you are under arrest for conspiracy against the state.
sol-type adj. 1950 P. Anderson Star Ship in Planet Stories Oct. 74/1 We’d been a few weeks out of Avandar—it was an obscure outpost then, though I imagine it’s grown since—when we detected this Sol-type sun. Seeing that there was an Earth-like planet, we decided to investigate. And since we were all tired of being cooped in the ship, and telescopes showed that any natives which might exist would be too primitive to endanger us, we all went down in the lifeboat.
sophont n. 1966 P. Anderson Trouble Twisters (1967) 56 Likewise with the psychology of intelligent species. Most sophonts indeed possess basic instincts which diverge more or less from man’s. With those of radically alien motivations we have little contact.
sophont n. 1968 P. Anderson Satan’s World in Analog Science Fiction/Fact May 28/2 From Lunograd, the Hotel Universe challenges a galaxy: ‘No oxygen-breathing sophont exists for whom we cannot provide suitable accommodation.’
space armor n. 1952 P. Anderson Garden in Void in Galaxy Science Fiction May 134/1 The space armor was awkward and bulky, a model which had been obsolete long before Hardesty left Earth, and its metal was patched and battered. There was no air-tank. A thick-leafed vine coiled around the square old-fashioned helmet, across the shoulders and down the back, like ivy on an ancient university building.
space armor n. 1961 P. Anderson Hiding Place in Analog Science Fact & Fiction Mar. 125/2 But at the end of the grace period, when Torrance was issuing space armor, Yamamure reported something new.
spaceboat n. 1952 P. Anderson Captive of Centaurianess in Planet Stories Mar. 24/1 At a mere fraction of the velocity of light—Ray thought of the consequences of hitting a planet when going faster than light, and wished he hadn’t—the spaceboat moved around Alpha A.
space-borne adj. 1960 P. Anderson High Crusade (1982) xiii. 77 Even though his information about us, our powers, and our possible spaceborne reinforcements was scanty, I think Huruga should have ordered the heavy wagons onward.
space-borne adj. 1999 P. Anderson Operation Luna xlviii. 305 Val had blurted an account of herself after she was spaceborne.
space colony n. 1949 P. Anderson Time Heals in Astounding Science Fiction Oct. 72/1 Well—dere are exceptions, ewen today. If dey cannot be adjusted, or will not be—since noting is legally compulsory—dey must eider be sent to space colonies or struggle trough an unhappy life on Eart, witout friends or marriage, witout ewen a group. But numbers deys gruw less all de time.
spacefarer n. 1971 P. Anderson A Little Knowledge in Analog Science Fiction Aug. 108/2 After all, with the hyperdrive opening endless wonders to them, spacefarers tended to choose the most obviously glamorous.
spacefaring n. 1956 P. Anderson Margin of Profit in Astounding Sept. 55/1 One good thing about spacefaring, you could set the artificial gravity low and feel almost young again.
spacefaring n. 1990 P. Anderson Inconstant Star in L. Niven et al. Man-Kzin Wars III (1992) ii. 181 Planetsiders seldom had any notion of the complications in spacefaring.
spacehand n. 1961 P. Anderson Hiding Place in Analog Science Fact & Fiction Mar. 139/2 A spacehand, a stocky slant-eyed nomad from Altai uncoiled a lariat.
spacehand n. 1990 P. Anderson Inconstant Star in L. Niven et al. Man-Kzin Wars III (1992) xviii. 287 Maybe, not being a spacehand, she won’t obey my order and stay at the boat.
space-suited adj. 1970 P. Anderson Tau Zero (1973) 140 The squat, unhuman forms of spacesuited men, the long curve of the hull, were seen as gleams, disconnected and fugitive.
spacewoman n. 1970 P. Anderson Tau Zero (1973) 8 Her civilian garments were more stylish than was common on a spacewoman.
star drive n. 1948 P. Anderson Genius in Astounding Science Fiction Dec. 25/1 They’ll know the principles of the star drive in a few more generations, and invent a faster-than-light engine almost at once!
star drive n. 1970 P. Anderson Tau Zero (1973) 34 Low acceleration on ion thrust had built up a modest outward speed, measurable in tens of kilometers per second. It sufficed to start the star-drive engine.
starfarer n. 1974 P. Anderson Fire Time 140 Well, they died, they died, the poor all-powerful star-farers.
starfarer n. 2000 P. Anderson Genesis iv. 43 When it reached its goal it transmitted its discoveries and experiences back to the central intelligence and to any humans who cared. Many did, often because the starfarer was not altogether alien. A robot aboard carried the spirit of Christian Brannock.
starfaring adj. 1960 P. Anderson High Crusade (1982) xiii. 78 Their skirmishes with rival starfaring nations were mostly aerial.
stunner n. 1970 P. Anderson Tau Zero (1973) 70 I’ll issue them weapons, stunner type only.
stunner n. 1978 P. Anderson Avatar (1981) 89 Each had a holstered sidearm: slugthrower, not stunner.
Sturgeon’s Law n. 1990 P. Anderson Beer Mutterings in Thrust Winter 16/2 Be it simply agreed that most of what appears to popular taste ranges from bad to abysmal. Sturgeon’s Revelation, you know: Ninety percent of everything is crud. (This is usually quoted as Sturgeon’s Law, but that, according to the man himself, reads ‘Nothing is every [sic] absolutely so’.)
sublight adj. 1956 P. Anderson Margin of Profit in Astounding Science Fiction Sept. 51/2 The shells have to be hypered themselves, of course, or they would revert to sublight velocity and be left behind as soon as they emerged from the drive field.
sublight adj. 1988 P. Anderson Iron in L. Niven et al. Man-Kzin Wars (1989) v. 47 The kzinti hurled a sublight fleet out of Alpha Centauri at variable intervals, but years apart, since one way or another they always lost heavily in the sanguinary campaigns that followed.
sublight adv. 1966 P. Anderson Sun Invisible in Analog Science Fiction/Science Fact Apr. 134/1 They’d also go sublight, and home on the neutrino emission of his power plant.
suit up v. 1966 P. Anderson Door To Anywhere in Galaxy Magazine Dec. 37/1 Technicians waited at the locker to help him suit up, for they must be armored against vacuum and worse.
superluminal adj. 1990 P. Anderson Inconstant Star in L. Niven et al. Man-Kzin Wars III (1992) v. 204 A warcraft of the Raptor class, lately modified to accommodate a superluminal drive, it moved faster than most, agilely responsive to he thrust of its gravity polarizers.
supernova n. 1966 P. Anderson Sun Invisible in Analog Science Fiction/Science Fact Apr. 130/1 Giant stars burn hydrogen so fast their existence is measured in millions of years. Millions, you hear, not billions. Beta Centauri can hardly be ten million years old. More than half its stable lifetime is past. It’ll go supernova and become a white dwarf. Life’d have no chance to evolve before the planets were destroyed.
system-wide adj. 1949 P. Anderson Double-Dyed Villains in Astounding Science Fiction Sept. 8/2 You want to win the coming system-wide election.
telekineticist n. 1979 P. Anderson Science Fiction & Science, pt. Three in J. Baen Destinies Apr.–June 314 In the late 1950’s and early 1960’s…it seemed that every second item in the magazines was a piece of hackwork about a telepath or a telekineticist who went to Las Vegas and won a fortune.
Terra n. 1960 P. Anderson High Crusade (1982) v. 31 Belike, I thought, when Scripture mentioned the four corners of the world, it did not mean our planet Terra at all, but referred to a cubical universe.
Terrestrial n. 1950 P. Anderson Star Ship in Planet Stories Oct. 74/1 There’d been Earthling girls; and not a few Khazaki women had been intrigued by the big Terrestrial.
Terrestrial n. 1957 P. Anderson Life Cycle in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction July 53/2 He was the pilot and engineer, the only other Terrestrial on Mercury. When you dove this far down into the sun’s monstrous gravitational well, you couldn’t take a big crew along.
three-D n. 1958 P. Anderson & K. Anderson Innocent At Large in Galaxy Science Fiction July 135/1 ‘That is a sexy type of furniture, all right’™, agreed Doran. He lowered himself into another chair, cocked his feet on the 3-D and waved a cigarette.
three-D n. 1962 P. Anderson Shield in Fantastic Stories of Imagination June 63/2 On his back he carried a lumpy metal cylinder; the harness included a plastic panel across his chest, with switches, knobs, and three meters. Like some science fiction hero on the 3D.
time hopper n. 1 1955 P. Anderson Time Patrol in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction May 21/1 Everard swung onto the time hopper, set the controls for 464 a.d. at Addleton Barrow, a summer midnight, and threw the switch.
torch n. 1989 P. Anderson Boat of Million Years (1990) 500 When it was safely away, robots went outside. Flitting around the hull, they deployed the latticework of ramscoop and fire chamber. By this time, low boost under torch drive had built up a considerable speed.
torch drive n. 1989 P. Anderson Boat of Million Years 388 By this time, low boost under the torch drive had built up a considerable speed.
tractor n. 1956 P. Anderson Margin of Profit in Astounding Science Fiction Sept. 58/1 A pressor beam lashed out, an invisible hammerblow of repulsion, five times the strength of the enemy tractor.
tri-D n. 1962 P. Anderson Shield in Fantastic Stories of Imagination June 63/2 On his back he carried a lumpy metal cylinder; the harness included a plastic panel across his chest, with switches, knobs, and three meters. Like some science fiction hero on the 3D.
tri-v n. 1964 P. Anderson To Build a World in Galaxy Magazine June 62/2 The TriV programs are dull.
tri-v n. 1965 P. Anderson Marque and Reprisal in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Feb. 6/2 I said the strip show was coming on the 3V in a minute and that’s what the customers wanted, not any of his foreign stuff.
ultradrive n. 1951 P. Anderson Tiger by Tail in Planet Stories Jan. 38/1 He grew aware of the thrum and quiver which meant he was aboard a spaceship running on ultra[-]drive.
unhuman n. 1960 P. Anderson High Crusade (1982) ii. 19 We were both cushioned against the frightful vision of our poor folk being harried by unhumans, destroyed or enslaved, because neither of us really believed it.
unsuit v. 1971 P. Anderson Byworlder in Fantastic Science Fiction & Fantasy Stories June iv. 30/1 He had unsuited and now hung close beside her, lightly holding a handgrip.
uptime adv. 1984 P. Anderson Discovery of Past in Past Times 186 Science fiction, of course, generally turns uptime, toward the future.
uptime adv. 1972 P. Anderson There Will Be Time (1973) 51 He would take certain stamps and coins uptime and sell them to dealers.
Vegan n. 1951 P. Anderson Inside Earth in Galaxy Science Fiction Apr. 19/1 A cosmopolitan throng filled the walkways… There were other races, blue-skinned Vegans, furry Proximans, completely non-humanoid Sirians and Antarians.
viewscreen n. 1963 P. Anderson Three-Cornered Wheel in Analog Science Fiction/Science Fact Oct. 60/2 He groaned out of his bunk and fumbled his way to the nearest viewscreen. What he saw brought him bolt awake.
viewscreen n. 1970 P. Anderson Tau Zero (1973) 34 In one of the garden rooms stood a viewscreen tuned to Outside.
viewscreen n. 1993 P. Anderson Harvest of Stars (1994) 10 A large viewscreen gave an outlook from the topmost spire.
visiphone n. 1971 P. Anderson Byworlder in Fantastic Science Fiction & Fantasy Stories June vi. 42/1 She had expected to savor her triumph. And the congratulations, from personnel at Armstrong Base, by visiphone from Dad and Mother and the whole family, from the President and her colleagues around the globe, certainly they warmed her to the marrow.
visiphone n. 1983 P. Anderson & G. R. Dickson Napoleon Crime in Analog Science Fiction/Science Fact Mar. 34/2 The man had called ahead for this appointment; even the most archaic-minded Hokas maintained essential modern equipment in their more important offices, although in the present case the visiphone was disguised as a Chippendale cabinet.
worldlet n. 1993 P. Anderson Harvest of Stars (1994) 56 The worldlet was little more than a darkness, faintly a-sheen where a crest jutted out of shadow, a piece torn from the sky that otherwise encompassed her.
xenological adj. 1969 P. Anderson Rebel Worlds (1972) 86 I gather Cave Discoverer’s an explorer and adventurer. Heesh first met humans by seekin’ out a xenological camp 200 kilometers from home.