Robert A. Heinlein

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Robert A. Heinlein

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45 First Quotations from Robert A. Heinlein

anywhen adv. 1941 ‘C. Saunders’ Elsewhere in Astounding Science Fiction Sept. 100/1 The younger man glanced about him. ‘Where are the others?’ ‘Where? Anywhere,’ replied Frost with a shrug, ‘and anywhen. ’
astrogate v. 1941 R. A. Heinlein Common Sense in Astounding Science-Fiction Oct. 138/2 My Chief Engineer assures me that the Main Converter could be started, but we have no one fitted to astrogate.
beanstalk n. 1982 R. A. Heinlein Friday 1 I have never liked riding the Beanstalk. My distaste was full-blown even before the disaster to the Quito Skyhook. A cable that goes up into the sky with nothing to hold it up smells too much of magic.
cold sleep n. 1941 R. A. Heinlein Methuselah's Children in Astounding Science-Fiction Aug. 96/1 By converting some of the recreation space to storerooms and adapting the storerooms thus cleared to the purpose of cold-sleep, the ship was roomy enough.
cold sleep v. 1956 R. A. Heinlein Door Into Summer in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Oct. 14/2 Damnation, he was quite capable of refusing to let me cold-sleep.
dirtside adv. 1953 R. A. Heinlein Starman Jones (1975) x. 102 He went dirtside with Sam, dressed in his best and filled with curiosity.
dirtside adv. 1953 R. A. Heinlein Starman Jones 64 If you mess it up, I'll leave you dirtside and raise without you. Let me see you walk again.
dropshaft n. 1949 R. A. Heinlein Gulf in Astounding Science Fiction Nov. 74/2 The corridor ahead and a turn to the left should bring him to the quick-drop shaft.
Earthside n. 1953 R. A. Heinlein Starman Jones (1975) x. 104 The Ozarks. That’s Earthside.
Earthside adj. 1949 R. A. Heinlein Gulf in Astounding Science Fiction Dec. 75/2 The arming circuit and the radio relay to the Earthside trigger is located on the Moon in a building inside her private dome.
Earth-type adj. 2 1941 R. A. Heinlein Methuselah's Children in Astounding Science-Fiction Aug. 98/1 To discover what sort and in particular whether it supported an Earth-type planet required a close approach at reasonably low speed.
ferry n. 1941 R. Heinlein Logic of Empire in Astounding Science-Fiction Mar. 10/1 The company has obligations to its stockholders…and it can’t afford to run an interplanetary ferry for the benefit of a class of people that feel that the world owes them a living.
fresher n. 1940 R. A. Heinlein Coventry in Astounding Science-Fiction July 78/1 ‘O.K.—shortly. Where’s the 'fresher?’ ‘Over there.’ It was not Dave’s idea of a refreshing chamber, but he managed to take a sketchy shower in spite of the slimy floor.
grok v. 1961 R. A. Heinlein Stranger in a Strange Land 18 Smith had been aware of the doctors but had grokked that their intentions were benign.
grok v. 1961 R. Heinlein Stranger in a Strange Land xxiv. 250 Now that he knew himself to be self he was free to grok ever closer to his brothers.
Luna City n. 1939 R. Heinlein Misfit in Astounding Science-Fiction Nov. 65/2 Then plants, conditioned by thirty-odd generations of low gravity at Luna City, were set out and tenderly cared for.
mutie n. 1941 R. A. Heinlein Universe in Astounding Science-Fiction May 16/2 There is even some question as to the original meaning of the word ‘mutie’. Certainly they number among their ancestors the mutineers who escaped death at the time of the rebellion. But they also have in their blood the blood of many of the mutants who were born during the dark age. You understand, of course, that during that period our present wise rule of inspecting each infant for the mark of sin and returning to the Converter any who are found to be mutations was not in force.
mutie n. 1941 R. A. Heinlein Universe in Astounding Science-Fiction May 17/2 Since the muties are the seed of sin, why do we make no effort to wipe them out?
nova v. 1949 R. A. Heinlein Gulf in Astounding Science-Fiction Nov. 89/1 You’ve heard of the asteroid ‘Earth-Anti’?… It ain’t there any more. It’s been novaed.
nova bomb n. 1953 R. A. Heinlein Gulf in Assignment in Eternity 80 Unless it is switched off any attempt to enter the building in which the arming circuit is housed will also trigger the ‘Nova’ bomb circuit.
nullgrav n. 1956 R. A. Heinlein Door Into Summer in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Nov. 26/2 Two things impressed me most, one big, one little. The big one was NullGrav, of course. Back in 1970 I had known about the Babson Institute gravitation research but I had not expected anything to come of it—and nothing had; the basic field theory on which NullGrav is based was developed at the University of Edinburgh.
parking orbit n. 1941 R. Heinlein Methuselah's Children in Astounding Science-Fiction Aug. 76/1 Approaching Earth, he called over the patrol frequency and asked for a parking orbit, as he did not wish to set the Chili down on Earth.
phaser n. [1953 R. A. Heinlein Starman Jones 67 They were a little slow synchronizing the field…or else this bucket of bolts has an unbalanced phaser. ]
pseudo-gravitation n. 1941 R. A. Heinlein Methuselah's Children in Astounding Science-Fiction Sept. 138/1 Yet the pseudogravitation, the false weight, achieved by the spin of the ship, persisted.
pseudogravitational adj. 1942 ‘A. MacDonald’ Waldo in Astounding Science-Fiction Aug. 50/2 He felt the pull of the pseudo gravitational field, felt his legs grow heavy.
rimworld n. 1957 R. A. Heinlein Citizen of Galaxy in Astounding Science Fiction Nov. 125/2 Hydra was cruising above speed-of-light toward the Rim world Ultima Thule, where she would refuel and start prowling for outlaws.
sci-fi n. [ 1949 R. A. Heinlein Letter 1 Oct. in R. A. Heinlein & V. Heinlein Grumbles from Grave (1990) 94 I have two short stories that I am very hot to do, one a bobby-sox for Calling All Girls and one a sci-fic [in published text: sci-fi] short which will probably sell to slick and is a sure sale for pulp. ]
slideway n. 1942 R. A. Heinlein in Astounding Science Fiction Apr. 9/1 Hamilton Felix let himself off at the thirteenth level of the Department of Finance, mounted a slideway to the left, and stepped off the strip.
somewhen adv. 1941 ‘C. Saunders’ Elsewhen in Astounding Science Fiction Sept. 114/1 When he ‘landed,’ it was not in the world of the future he had visited twice before. He did not know where he was—on earth, apparently, somewhere and somewhen.
space v. 2 1952 R. A. Heinlein Rolling Stones 49 ‘Grandpa…how would you like to be spaced?’ ‘No future in it. Thin stuff, vacuum. Low vitamin content.’
space v. 2 1952 R. A. Heinlein Rolling Stones 244 Sound effect of blow with blunt instrument, groan, and the unmistakable cycling of an air lock—Castor: ‘Sorry, folks. My assistant has just spaced Mr. Rudolf.’
stasis field n. 1942 ‘A. MacDonald’ Beyond This Horizon in Astounding Science Fiction Apr. 31/1 Monroe-Alpha began to understand what they were talking about. It was the so-called Adirondack stasis field. It had been a three-day wonder when it was discovered, a generation earlier, in a remote part of the mountains from which it got its name.
suit up v. 1948 R. A. Heinlein Black Pits of Luna in G. Conklin Possible Worlds of Science Fiction (1951) 26 I’ll go with you. Let’s suit up.
torch n. 1950 R. A. Heinlein Satellite Scout in Boy’s Life Sept. 28 The Mayflower was top shaped. The point of the top was her jet—Chief Engineer Ortega, who showed us around, called it her ‘torch’.
torch v. 1956 R. A. Heinlein Double Star in Astounding Science Fiction Feb. 29/2 About seventeen seconds and a gnat’s wink after we make contact the Go For Broke will torch for Mars…for we’ve got to be there by Wednesday.
torch v. 1956 R. A. Heinlein Double Star in Astounding Mar. 104/1 I let myself be shanghaied aboard the spaceship Tom Paine and we were torching for Mars.
torcher n. 1953 R. A. Heinlein Sky Lift in Imagination Nov. 8/2 He held a torcher’s contempt for the vast distance itself. Older pilots thought of interplanetary trips with a rocketman’s bias, in terms of years—trips that a torchship with steady acceleration covered in days.
torcher n. 1953 R. A. Heinlein Sky Lift in Imagination Nov. 19/1 The idea that anyone but a torcher could work a torch ballistic did not sink in.
torchship n. 1953 R. A. Heinlein Sky Lift in Imagination Nov. 8/2 He held a torcher’s contempt for the vast distance itself. Older pilots thought of interplanetary trips with a rocketman’s bias, in terms of years—trips that a torchship with steady acceleration covered in days.
Venerian n. 2 1948 R. A. Heinlein Space Cadet 233 Oscar swore softly in Venerian. ‘They can do anything!’
vibroblade n. 1940 R. A. Heinlein If This Goes On— in Astounding Science-Fiction 18/1 He won’t come to…. I slipped a vibroblade between his ribs.
waldo n. 1942 ‘A. MacDonald’ Waldo in Astounding Science-Fiction Aug. 16/2 Even the…humanoid gadgets known universally as ‘waldoes’…passed through several generations of development…in Waldo’s machine shop before he redesigned them for mass production. The first of them…had been designed to enable Waldo to operate a metal lathe.
xenobiologist n. 1954 R. A. Heinlein Star Lummox in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction May 60 Once the xenobiologists got their hands on Lummox they would never let him go.
xenobiology n. 1954 R. A. Heinlein Star Lummox in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction May 60 I have never taken any interest in xenobiology.
xenology n. 1954 R. A. Heinlein Star Lummox in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction May 27 I meant to major in xenology and exotic biology in college.