Jack Williamson

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Jack Williamson

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26 First Quotations from Jack Williamson

alien life form n. [1928 J. Williamson Metal Man in Amazing Stories Dec. 796/2 It was a terribly, utterly alien form of life. It was not human, not animal—not even life as we know it at all. And yet it had intelligence. But it was strange and foreign and devoid of feeling.]
android n. 1936 J. Williamson Cometeers in Astounding Science-Fiction Aug. 146/2 The traffic that brought him such enormous wealth was the production and sale of androids…. [He] had come upon the secret of synthetic life. He generated artificial cells, and propagated them in nutrient media, controlling development by radiological and biochemical means.
areological adj. 1932 J. Williamson & L. Schwartzman Red Slag of Mars in Wonder Stories Quarterly Spring 395/2 Dr. Eldred…was head of the Eldred Areological Expedition, which sailed…six years ago, for the planet Mars.
continuum n. 1938 J. Williamson Infinite Enemy in Thrilling Wonder Stories Apr. 49/1 In the end, all the matter in this Universe-continuum had been consumed—all save the body of its brother being. It attacked him, also. But Mock-sun protected himself. He created this silvery shield--walling himself, in fact, into a tiny sub-space manifold of his own.
credit n. [1931 M. J. Breuer & J. Williamson Birth of a New Republic in Amazing Stories Quarterly Winter 25/1 The Assembly met again, made an appropriation of five million credit units to defray the expenses of the war, and issued a call for volunteers to fight for the freedom of the planet.]
energy weapon n. [1937 J. Williamson Blue Spot in Astounding Stories Feb. 125/1 He told my father that I had been attacked and overcome by the material energy weapons of the troglodytes, that I was helpless and in need of aid.]
gate n. 1931 J. Williamson Through the Purple Cloud in Wonder Stories May 1408/1 The purple circle that came in front of the plane looked just like that… We have seen the gate to our world opened again—I am sure of it.
ion drive n. 1947 J. Williamson Equalizer in Astounding Science Fiction Mar. 18/1 Lifecraft 18 was a trim steel missile… It had its own ion drive, a regular crew of six, and plenty of additional space for our party.
planetary engineer n. 1932 J. Williamson Electron Flame in Wonder Stories Quarterly Fall 88/2 Bought the satellite for his private estate. Had planetary engineers make all modern improvements.
planetary engineering n. 1936 J. Williamson Cometeers in Astounding Stories July 129/1 Planetary engineering is expensive, Bob…especially when the equipment would have to be brought so far. It would have been nearly impossible for any one to develop such a remote asteroid secretly.
psionic adj. 1951 J. Williamson Peddler's Nose in Astounding Science Fiction Apr. 39/2 The man spoke a harsh-sounding tongue he had never heard before, but the psionic translator, a tiny device no more conspicuous than the native’s hearing aid, brought the meaning to him instantly.
psionic adj. 1951 J. Williamson Peddler's Nose in Astounding Science Fiction Apr. 44/1 The bright psionic labels looked blank at first, but they came to shining life under the eyes of the children, responding to the thoughts of each.
psionic adj. 1951 J. Williamson Man From Outside in Astounding Science Fiction Mar. 130/1 The psionic translators rendered his name as Bowman, but its original clicking consonants were unpronounceable.
psionics n. 1951 J. Williamson Greatest Invention in Astounding Science Fiction July 79/1 If they had known psionics, their children would never have relapsed into savagery.
seetee n. 1942 ‘W. Stewart’ Collision Orbit in Astounding Science Fiction July 81/2 For ‘seetee’, to the engineer’s mind of old Jim Drake, meant power. Terror to others, to him it was atomic energy, priceless and illimitable. The whole meteor belt was rich in contraterrene drift. ibid. Molecules of any gas reacted with seetee, in deadly flame.
sentience n. 1 1937 J. Williamson Released Entropy in Astounding Stories Aug. 23/1 A cold cloud of darkness followed after him, implacable in its alien sentience.
space liner n. 1931 J. Williamson Twelve Hours to Live! in Wonder Stories Aug. 355/1 For three days, Captain Grant had kept his great space-liner, with her rich cargo of uranium salts from the mines on the outer satellite of Neptune and her hundreds of passengers, ahead of the questing disintegrator rays of the Black Hawk only by burning his full battery of reaction-motors at their maximum power.
spaceport n. 1930 M. Breuer & J. Williamson Birth of a New Republic in Amazing Stories Quarterly Winter 29/1 The space-ports at the three great cities, were, of course, occupied or blockaded by the Tellurian fleets; and Doane was obliged to make his bases of operations the lonely craters that once had been pirate strongholds.
subspace n. 1937 J. Williamson Released Entropy in Astounding Stories Aug. 17/2 Yet, swift as was the Silver Bird, plunging through millions of miles in a second, drawn into a tiny subspace of her own by the field warp of the kappa coils, seven years had passed before she approached her destination.
terraform v. 1942 J. Williamson Collision Orbit in Astounding Science-Fiction July 82/1 He had been the original claimant of Obania, forty years ago; and Drake was the young spatial engineer he employed to terraform the little rock, only two kilometers through—by sinking a shaft to its heart for the paragravity installation, generating oxygen and water from mineral oxides, releasing absorptive gases to trap the feeble heat of the far-off Sun.
terraform v. 1942 J. Williamson Collision Orbit in Astounding Science-Fiction July 90/1 Rick was impressed to discover that Pallas, capital of all the Mandate, was not yet completely terraformed—although the city and a score of mining centers had their own paragravity units a few miles beneath the surface, there was as yet no peegee installation at the center of gravity.
terraformed adj. 1942 ‘W. Stewart’ Minus Sign in Astounding Science-Fiction Nov. 47/2 Rick omitted breakfast and hurried to the laboratory, just under the crown of the terraformed hill.
terraformer n. 1942 ‘W. Stewart’ Minus Sign in Astounding Science-Fiction Nov. 51/2 Beyond a hidden doorway a guarded elevator dropped them to the terraformer room at the center of gravity.
terraforming n. 1942 J. Williamson Collision Orbit in Astounding Science-Fiction July 85/2 Smaller… Less than a tenth the mass. There’s plenty of time to land a terraforming crew, to install a new-type directional drive. It’s a job for the guard.
terraforming n. 1942 J. Williamson Collision Orbit in Astounding Science-Fiction July 87/2 But the directional space drive; the negative safety field, to guard a ship’s hull from spatial drift; the peegee reducer, that broke up compounds by direct selective attraction, yielding oxygen to breathe and iron for construction out of common hematite; the peegee terraforming unit, that held man and his precious blanket of air to any tiny rock—those were all unexpected gifts, amazing even the engineer.
ultrawave n. [1932 J. Williamson & L. Schwartzman Red Slag of Mars in Wonder Stories Quarterly Spring 402/2 Then I saw the deadly little ultra-wave projector in Satsuma’s yellow hand, an ominous bluish glow flickering about the point of the the tube…. ‘You don’t dare use that!’ I shot at him. A pencil of blue hissed at me, for answer. A hot needle of pain seared across my shoulder; smoke of burned flesh and fabric burst from me. I still wear the mark of Satsuma’s ray.]