Edmond Hamilton

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Edmond Hamilton

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70 Quotations from Edmond Hamilton

Aldebaranian n. 1 1930 E. Hamilton Comet-Drivers in Weird Tales Feb. iii. 189/2 When Gor Han’s deep whisper had ceased we were silent a moment, and surely never did stranger trio crouch in stranger place than we three, earth-man and amphibian Aldebaranian and great fur-clad Betelgeusan, there in the crimson dusk of the comet-city, all about us the pits that held its countless liquid- creatures and above us the glowing red coma which encompassed this world and was driving on toward our galaxy’s doom.
android n. 1940 E. Hamilton Captain Future & Space Emperor in Captain Future Winter 17/2 It was a manlike figure, but one whose body was rubbery, boneless-looking, blank-white in color…. Following this rubbery android, or synthetic man, came another figure, equally as strange—a great metal robot.
artificial intelligence n. [1951 E. Hamilton Moon of the Unforgotten in Startling Stories Jan. 120/1 Grag, the towering manlike giant who bore in his metal frame the strength of an army and an artificial intelligence equal to the human, rumbled a question in his deep booming voice.]
beam weapon n. 1936 E. Hamilton Mutiny on Europa in Thrilling Wonder Stories Dec. 70/1 We could see an officer inside, checking the racks of beam-weapons.
Betelgeusean n. 1 1930 E. Hamilton Comet-Drivers in Weird Tales Feb. 276/2 Silent we stood again, at that, and then Gor Han and Jurt Tul reached forth, Betelgeusan [sic] and Aldebaranian and earth-man clasping hands in a moment’s grip.
disruptor n. 1949 E. Hamilton Star Kings (1975) 147 Do you dream he can conquer the Empire when we have the Disruptor to use in case of necessity?
earthborn adj. 1961 E. Hamilton City at World's End xii. 90 We are Earth-born.
Earth-type adj. 1 1941 E. Hamilton Son Two Worlds in Thrilling Wonder Stories Aug. 28/2 Most of these Martians wore Earth-type synthesuits of somber hues.
Earthward adj. 1929 E. Hamilton Other Side of the Moon in Amazing Stories Quarterly Fall 530/2 Without that shield above it the air about us would rush forth into the void instantly and leave this far side of the moon as dead and cold and barren as the earthward side!
energy gun n. 1947 E. Hamilton Star of Life in Startling Stories Jan. 26/1 The energy-guns were in effect small generators capable of ejecting concentrated streams of protons.
Europan n. 1 1951 E. Hamilton Moon of Unforgotten in Startling Stories Jan. iii. 127/2 Curt dismounted and stood holding the bridle. He said to the Europan[,] ‘Go back to the spaceport, to the Patrol base. Tell those who wait there for us where we are.’ A gleam that was almost a light of hope began to show in the young man’s eyes. ‘And you?’ he asked. Curt nodded toward the blind notch of the pass. ‘We are going in.’
force beam n. 1930 E. Hamilton Comet-Drivers in Weird Tales Feb. 175/2 If we can reach the great oncoming comet, can penetrate through its deadly coma to the solid nucleus at its center, can deflect that nucleus with our force-beams before the twelfth day ends, we will have turned the great comet aside, will have saved the galaxy itself from death.
force beam n. 1929 E. Hamilton Other Side of the Moon in Amazing Stories Quarterly Fall 522/2 I think it will be soon that the invasion will come, that their great cylinders will flash down their mighty force-beam to earth.
galactographer n. 1965 E. Hamilton in Amazing Stories Apr. 24/2 Early galactographers had defined it as that part of the galaxy which lay between the eastern and southern kingdoms, and the edge of the island-universe.
galactographic adj. 1969 E. Hamilton Horror from Magellanic in Amazing Stories May 11/1 Is there some place here where we can make some galactographic computations?
galactography n. 1973 E. Hamilton Shores of Infinity in Thrilling Science Fiction Aug. 21/1 Gordon remembered his galactography well enough to realize that every realm represented here lay near the Marches of Outer Space.
gateway n. 1928 E. Hamilton The Dimension Terror in Weird Tales June 784/2 They had spared my life, so far, but that I could only attribute to the fact that of all men on earth I knew most about the contact, which was the gateway from their world to ours.
gravity screen n. 1926 E. Hamilton Across Space in Weird Tales Oct. 528/1 With all their advance in science, they had lost the secret of the space-ships, the gravity screen.
home galaxy n. 1936 E. Hamilton Cosmic Quest in Thrilling Wonder Stories Oct. 36/2 I knew that by now I must have almost completely circumnavigated the spherical cosmos and before long would approach my home galaxy. Before long, I must return to my waiting people with the black news that I had failed.
home sun n. 1929 E. Hamilton Outside the Universe in Weird Tales Oct. 520/1 Something of emotion rose in me as they shifted to Antares, the great crimson star that had been Korus Kan’s home sun.
homeworld n. 1930 E. Hamilton Universe Wreckers in Amazing Stories June 269/1 Our eyes were accustomed to the dim Neptunian day, our bodies to its great gravitational power, and it was our home[-]world.
impeller n. 1940 E. Hamilton Three Planeteers in Startling Stories Jan. iv. 26/2 He shot floatingly away from the wreck. As his momentum faded and he began to float back toward the wreck, Thorn switched on the impeller in his hand. The blast from it kicked his space-suited figure on through space.
Jovian n. 2 [1932 E. Hamilton Conquest of Two Worlds in Wonder Stories Feb. 1052/1 Halkett had learned the Jovian language and proved a good ambassador.]
lifeship n. 1930 E. Hamilton Evans of the Earth-Guard in Air Wonder Stories Apr. 943/1 But I’m afraid that will be a little late. For I waited to make this coup, to gas the crew and stun you, until we were just at this particular position in space. It is the prearranged position, and less than five thousand miles off this space-lane my own rocket and crew are waiting for me. We’re heading toward them now, and before your crew wakes, Evans,we’ll be with them and this rocket will be in their hands. You and your crew won't be harmed, of course--we can set you loose in a life ship near the moon—but this Earth-Guard craft we’ll keep and it should prove highly useful. An ingenious plan, everything considered, don’t you think? Nothing overlooked.
Martian n. 2 1957 E. Hamilton World of Never-Men in Imaginative Tales July 7/1 ‘Come out of there,’ he said in rapid Martian.
matter-transmitting adj. 1931 E. Hamilton Monsters of Mars in Astounding Stories Apr. 12/2 You built the matter-transmitting and receiving station on earth that was the one thing needed for our plan.
midspace n. 1932 E. Hamilton Conquest of Two Worlds in Wonder Stories Feb. 1048/1 Drake’s expedition proved a classic in disaster. Two of his ten rockets perished in mid-space in a meteor swarm. Many of the men in the other rockets were struck down by the malign combination of the weightlessness, the unsoftened ultra-violet rays, and the terrific glare and gloom of mid-space.
midspace n. 1929 E. Hamilton Outside the Universe in Weird Tales July 49/1 Our whole ship suddenly spun crazily in mid-space.
mutant n. 1938 E. Hamilton He That Hath Wings in Weird Tales July 72/1 Muller, of the University of Texas, has demonstrated that gene-patterns can be greatly altered by radiation, and that the offspring of parents so treated will differ greatly from their parents in bodily form. That accident produced an entirely new gene-pattern in the parents of this child, one which developed their child into a winged human. He’s what biologists technically call a mutant.
mutation n. [ 1931 E. Hamilton Man Who Evolved in Wonder Stories Apr. 1269/2 For it is the cosmic rays, beating upon every living organism on earth, that cause the profound changes in the structure of those organisms which we call mutations. ]
Neptunian n. 1 1946 E. Hamilton Outlaw World in Startling Stories Winter 30/1 The place was packed with the most motley, hard-bitten interplanetary throng that could be assembled in the System. Jovians, Venusians, Neptunians, Earthmen, and men of every other planet, all of them wearing weapons and all of them drinking and carousing with equally hard-eyed women.
Neptunian n. 2 1930 E. Hamilton Universe Wreckers in Amazing Stories June 276/2 For that reason you have been saved, and have been taught our Neptunian tongue.
Neptunian adj. 1930 E. Hamilton Universe Wreckers in Amazing Stories July 348/2 We had reached the dark side of Triton, we knew, and now moved mare carefully still, for upon that dark side, we knew equally well, slept half the massed millions of the Neptunian races.
planetless adj. 1929 E. Hamilton Outside the Universe in Weird Tales July 66/1 Directly ahead of us, though, there flamed a small crimson sun, a dying, planetless star not far inward from the Cancer cluster.
ray projector n. 1928 E. Hamilton Crashing Suns in Weird Tales Sept. 382/1 My own flagship and the designated few agreed on were dipping swiftly toward the great tower-platform, where stood the ray-projector which we had fought our way from universe to universe to reach.
ray-proof adj. 1947 E. Hamilton Star of Life in Startling Stories Jan. 71/2 Thank heaven I so suspected the full effect of the rays that I prevailed on Wilson and the others to keep their rayproof body[-]shields on until we were more sure.
rocketman n. 1931 E. Hamilton Creatures of the Comet in Weird Tales Dec. 632/1 Space-struck, both of them…. But I never heard of even a nutty rocket-man who would monkey with a comet!
Saturnian n. 1 1945 E. Hamilton Red Sun of Danger in Startling Stories Spring vii. 33/1 As the brief twilight of Roo darkened, Captain Future lounged around the plantation. The warehouse was empty of dried vitron. The plantation was a mere mask for Li Sham’s real activities. He, the Saturnian, and the two Uranians shared a carelessly-cooked dinner which had been cooked by a stringy, sullen Neptunian. Then Newton followed Li Sham out into the darkness to the rocket-car.
scanner n. 1942 E. Hamilton Face of the Deep in Captain Future (1943) Winter ii. 8/1 ‘What kind of amateur outfit do you think the Patrol is?’ Ezra demanded injuredly. ‘O’ course we searched them. We used the X-Ray “scanner” on each convict as he was brought into the ship.’
shuttlecraft n. 1967 E. Hamilton Weapon From Beyond 150 They marched across the blowing sand and into the golden shuttle-craft that would take them to the rescue ship.
spaceboat n. 1928 E. Hamilton Crashing Suns in Weird Tales Aug. 194/1 They had gone out to planet after planet, had conquered the strange atmospheres and bacteria and gravitations, until now the races of man held sway over all the sun’s eight wheeling worlds. And it was from this Earth, a thousand centuries before, that there had ventured out the first discoverers’ crude little space[-]boats, whose faulty gravity-screens and uncertain controls contrasted strangely with the mighty leviathans that flashed between the planets now.
space bronzed adj. 1940 E. Hamilton Revolt on the Tenth World in Amazing Stories Nov. 60/1 Jimmy Crane’s voice was hoarse with passion, his worn, space-bronzed young face quivering.
space explorer n. 1945 E. Hamilton Inn Outside World in My Best Science Fiction Story 92 Loring, the space-explorer, looked anxiously at the bald Greek next him.
space lane n. 1928 E. Hamilton Crashing Suns in Weird Tales Aug. 200/2 Though I was peculiarly affected by the strangeness of our position, big Hal Kur was even more so. He had traveled the space-lanes of the solar system for the greater part of his life, and now all of his time-honored rules of interplanetary navigation had been upset by this new cruiser, a craft entirely without gravity-screens, which was flashing from sun to sun propelled by invisible vibrations only.
space law n. 1942 E. Hamilton World with a Thousand Moons in Amazing Stories Dec. 87/1 ‘But just to shoot them down!’ said Gloria horrifiedly. ‘I won’t stand for that!’ Murdock took her by the arm. ‘It’s space law, Gloria,’ he told her earnestly. ‘You’d better go back into the ship.’
spacemanship n. 1947 E. Hamilton Star of Life in Startling Stories Jan. 25/2 Rab Quobba and little Tammas stayed when Wilson had gone, and Hammond plied them with eager questions about the spacemanship of this age.
space patrol n. 1930 E. Hamilton Evans of the Earth-Guard in Air Wonder Stories Apr. 906/1 If he was a space-pirate, he was not one like the earlier space-buccaneers whose atrocities had roused a fury that had swept them out of existence… By the end of his week of relief Evans’ nerves were ragged and he was longing for the peacefulness of the space patrol.
space pirate n. 1930 E. Hamilton Evans of the Earth-Guard in Air Wonder Stories Apr. 906/1 If he was a space-pirate, he was not one like the earlier space-buccaneers whose atrocities had roused a fury that had swept them out of existence. He was, if anything, a gentleman-corsair of the void.
space rocket n. 1932 E. Hamilton in Amazing Stories Oct. 578 (title) Space Rocket Murders
space sailor n. 1942 E. Hamilton World with a Thousand Moons in Amazing Stories Dec. 66/2 Earthmen were fairly numerous in this main port of the planet. Swaggering space-sailors, prosperous-looking traders and rough meteor-miners made up the most of them. There were a few tourists gaping at the grotesque old black stone buildings, and under a krypton-bulb at a corner, two men in the drab uniform of the Patrol stood eyeing passersby sharply. Kenniston breathed more easily when he and the Jovian had passed the two officers without challenge.
spacesickness n. 1932 E. Hamilton in Wonder Stories Feb. 1048/1 This space-sickness had put about a half of Drake’s men out of usefulness, Halkett and Burnham among them, when his eight rockets swung in to land near the Martian equator.
space-suited adj. 1931 E. Hamilton Sargasso of Space in Astounding Stories Sept. 405/2 Liggett pointed to two space-suited bodies twitting together in space, with bars still in their lifeless grasp. Kent saw through their shattered helmets the stiffened faces of Jandron and Krell, their helmets having apparently been broken by each other’s simultaneous blows.
spacewalker n. 1930 E. Hamilton Universe Wreckers in Amazing Stories June 254/1 Four space-walkers, specially designed to be used by the men outside of the space-flier in interplanetary space in case of an emergency, are also included among the accessories.
spacewalker n. 1930 E. Hamilton Universe Wreckers in Amazing Stories May 111/1 Also attached to hooks on the walls were the four space-walkers that had been constructed for us to enable us to venture outside of the flier into airless space, if necessary.
space yacht n. 1931 E. Hamilton Sargasso of Space in Astounding Stories Sept. 400/2 They moved on to the next ship, a private space-yacht, small in size, but luxurious in fittings.
starfarer n. [1945 ‘B. Sterling’ Red Sun of Danger in Startling Stories Spring 21/1 The man Rab Cain got away—took passage in the Starfarer, the emigrant ship bound for Arkar.]
starport n. 1951 E. Hamilton Moon of the Unforgotten in Startling Stories Jan. 131/2 Curt Newton….spoke with casual interest to the grave robed man who was walking with him toward the starport terminal.
starport n. 1950 E. Hamilton City at World’s End in Startling Stories July 60/1 She and Piers Eglin and Gorr Holl were with him in the official car—a sleek machine, very swift and silent, that carried them from the monster starport to the city itself.
starship n. 1947 E. Hamilton Star of Life in Startling Stories Jan. 24/2 In each solar system there are a handful of Vramen who keep constant check, by means of super-radiolocator devices, over every star-ship that arrives at or departs from that system.
star system n. 1929 E. Hamilton Within the Nebula in Weird Tales May 599/1 He was of the race of Canopus, natives of this giant star-system.
suited adj. 1967 E. Hamilton Weapon From Beyond 99 He looked at Chane…and considered what would happen if he dropped him out of a hatchway, suited and attached to a signal flare.
suit phone n. 1931 E. Hamilton Sargasso of Space in Astounding Stories 397/1 As they returned up the dim corridor Kent managed to walk beside Marta Mallen, and, without being seen, he contrived to detach his suit-phone—the compact little radiophone case inside his space-suit’s neck—and slip it into the girl’s grasp. He dared utter no word of explanation, but apparently she understood, for she had concealed the suit-phone by the time they reached the upper-deck.
superpower n. 1952 E. Hamilton in Superman May—June 1 (in figure) Superman, mighty man of steel whose super-powers have conquered catastrophes and wrecked wrong-doers!
system-wide adj. 1940 E. Hamilton Three Planeteers in Startling Stories Jan. 59/1 The system-wide demand for them was responsible for the fact that slith-hunting was a profession on this world.
telepath v. 1947 E. Hamilton Star of Life in Startling Stories Jan. 56/2 Mar Kann has already telepathed me information…that you Hoomen come here seeking the secret of immortality.
Vegan n. 1 1930 E. Hamilton Sun People in Weird Tales May iv. 621/2 But most terrible of all in that grim combat was Mirk En. The great octopus-like Vegan had gripped the square’s edge firmly with two of his mighty tentacles, and now with the other seven of those tentacle-arms was gripping cube-creature after cube-creature in the scores that whirled about him, was slamming them down upon the square’s surface with terrific force, his mighty arms cutting paths of death through the throngs that swirled about him.
Vegan adj. 1930 E. Hamilton Sun People in Weird Tales May iv. 622/2 The great Vegan Science Chief uttered an order and in a moment one of our crew had brought from another of the cruiser’s rooms the thought-speech machine, a compact metal cabinet from which five flat metal bands led, ending in shining little clips.
Vestan n. 1942 E. Hamilton World with a Thousand Moons in Amazing Stories Dec. 83/2 ‘Bray is beyond saving now,’ Kenniston said. ‘The Vestan parasite will control his body till he dies. The Vestans always like to attach themselves to human beings—they know that a man’s body is more versatile in its capabilities than an animal’s.’
Vestan n. 1942 E. Hamilton World with a Thousand Moons in Amazing Stories Dec. 69/2 ‘I accept your proposition, Mr. Kenniston!’ Gloria declared. ‘We’ll start for Vesta just as soon as you can get the equipment you’ll need loaded on the Sunsprite.’ ‘Gloria, you’re being too hasty,’ protested Hugh Murdock. ‘I’ve heard of this world with a Thousand Moons. There’re stories of queer, unhuman creatures they call Vestans, who infest that asteroid. The danger—’
warp v. 1956 E. Hamilton Citadel of the Star Lords in Imagination Oct. 15/1 They warped the ordered fabric of the space-time continuum itself, and acting on the matter of himself and his plane at the ‘eye’ of the explosion, had warped them too—into the future.