Margaret St. Clair

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Margaret St. Clair

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7 Quotations from Margaret St. Clair

gee n. 1 1949 M. St. Clair Sacred Martian Pig in Startling Stories July 92/1 I've more muscle than you, and I'm used to greater gee, being from earth.
gee n. 1 1949 M. St. Clair Sacred Martian Pig in Startling Stories July 92/2 Martian buildings, even public ones, rarely had levitators or even lifts. The lesser gee made stair-climbing less onerous than on Terra and Martians of both sexes insisted it wasn’t reasonable to avoid exercise. Stairs were good for the legs.
sentient adj. 1950 M. St. Clair Pillows in Thrilling Wonder Stories June 138/2 In the first place, the pillows were sentient and intelligent.
sentient adj. 1950 M. St. Clair Pillows in Thrilling Wonder Stories June 138/2 Really, it was no more fantastic than the assumption he had already made, without much mental discomfort, that they could influence the course of events. But this was something that every human being, that every sentient being, takes for granted every moment of his life.
sentient adj. 1950 M. St. Clair Pillows in Thrilling Wonder Stories June 138/2 In the third place—This was where Kent’s mind jibbed. Really, it was no more fantastic than the assumption he had already made, without much mental discomfort, that they could influence the flow of events. But this was something that every human being, that every sentient being, takes for granted every moment of his life. To endow the pillows with this ability was to fracture the supporting column of the Universe.
space travelling n. 1950 M. St. Clair Pillows in Thrilling Wonder Stories June 135/1 Ten days later they landed on Eschaton—a routine landing, but interesting to Kent, who had done little space traveling.
super-science n. 1946 M. St. Clair Presenting the Author in Fantastic Adventures Nov. 2/2 I like to write about ordinary people of the future, surrounded by gadgetry of super-science, but who, I feel sure, know no more about how the machinery works than a present day motorist knows of the laws of thermodynamics.