Harry Warner, Jr.

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14 Quotations from Harry Warner, Jr.

apazine n. 1969 H. Warner, Jr. All our Yesterdays 3 Another fascinating near-miss in this instinct toward the fanzine was experienced by one Howard Scott, an amateur journalist in the 1870’s. He issued a publication called The Rambler and collected ayjay publications of others that laid much stress on speculative science. A surviving bound volume of such apazines contains such items as an article about possible inhabitants of other worlds, information on the more abstruse habits of birds, mesmerism facts, and a discussion on the possibilities of phonetic spelling. There must have been trufaanish instincts among Scott’s circle.
congoer n. 1992 H. Warner, Jr. Wealth of Fable 339 Alarm over the way attendance increased at worldcons in the 1950s inspired some committees in the 1960s to soft pedal or ban advance publicity for the worldcon in the host city, in order to minimize walk-in congoers.
conreport n. 1992 H. Warner, Jr. Wealth of Fable 338 He criticized fanzine con reports in which ‘a detailing of the number of hamburgers consumed en route often consumes more wordage than a description of program events, and mention of a first meeting with a new fan from Squeegee, Wyoming is deemed more spaceworthy than an appraisal of the guest of honor.’
croggle v. 1992 W. Tucker in H. Warner Wealth of Fable Introd. p. x, And yes, he is still publishing that fanzine. Horizons is now up to its two hundred and fifth issue, a remarkable record since 1939. And he still sees himself as a miserable second-rate Lovecraft. He said so on the phone when I called him again. Sometimes Harry croggles me.
fanac n. 1969 H. Warner, Jr. All Our Yesterdays (1972) xx. Gafia, getting away from it all; growing inactive in fandom, and as a verb, to gafiate; originally it meant the opposite, getting away from the mundane world by engaging in fanac.
fannishness n. 1969 H. Warner, Jr. All our Yesterdays 4 The most famous science fiction writers had lives that occasionally brushed early stirrings of fannishness.
fugghead n. 1969 H. Warner, Jr. All our Yesterdays xx Fugghead—Originally, bowdlerized written version of a vivid slang word, later an independent insult of only medium severity.
gafiate v. 1969 H. Warner, Jr. All Our Yesterdays (1972) xx. Gafia, getting away from it all; growing inactive in fandom, and as a verb, to gafiate; originally it meant the opposite, getting away from the mundane world by engaging in fanac.
mundane n. 1 1946 H. Warner, Jr. in Horizons (vol. 7, iss. 4, whole no. 27) Jun. 1 Not all the stories in this book are fantasy. ‘Asaph’, ‘His Wife’s Deceased Sister’, ‘A Piece of Red Calico’, and the inevitable ‘The Lady, or the Tiger?’ are mundanes, and definitely inferior in literary worth to the remainder of the volume.
mundane n. 2 1969 H. Warner, Jr. All Our Yesterdays 145 He claimed that he was immediately honored by fourteen fans and eight mundanes at a banquet staged for him by the Oak Grove Science Fiction Society.
spaceworthy adj. 1992 H. Warner, Jr. Wealth of Fable 338 He criticized fanzine con reports in which ‘a detailing of the number of hamburgers consumed en route often consumes more wordage than a description of program events, and mention of a first meeting with a new fan from Squeegee, Wyoming is deemed more spaceworthy than an appraisal of the guest of honor.’
thought-variant n. 1939 H. Warner, Jr. It’s Astounding in Fantascience Digest (vol. 2, iss. 5) July–Sept. 25 I should say that the first strong indication was in the ‘thought-variant’ (sicken you?) ‘ANCESTRAL VOICES’, featuring Mrs. Murphy and her famous children and baked beans. Then, with the first issue of 1934, came ‘COLOSSUS’, another ‘thought-variant’, and the rush was on.
worldcon n. 1969 H. Warner, Jr. All our Yesterdays 11 For a person with reclusive tendencies, Lovecraft showed impressive stamina and gregariousness at ayjay meetings. His death undoubtedly deprived the first fannish worldcons of a professional focal point.
worldcon n. 1992 H. Warner, Jr. Wealth of Fable 339 Alarm over the way attendance increased at worldcons in the 1950s inspired some committees in the 1960s to soft pedal or ban advance publicity for the worldcon in the host city, in order to minimize walk-in congoers.