John J. Pierce

See first quotes from John J. Pierce

5 Quotations from John J. Pierce

cyborged adj. 1993 J. J. Pierce in C. Smith Rediscovery of Man Introd. p. ix You doubtless know that it was ‘Scanners’ which introduced the Instrumentality of Mankind, although only as a shadowy background to the bizarre tale of the cyborged space pilots who are dead though they live, and would rather kill than live with a new discovery that has made their sacrifice and its attendant rituals obsolete.
disaster adj. 1987 J. J. Pierce Great Themes of Science Fiction viii. 143 John Christopher (1922— ) is a specialist in the realistic, Earthbound disaster novel, and his No Blade of Grass (1956, as The Death of Grass ) is typical of the school: A mutant virus infects the world’s grain crops, leaving billions to face starvation.
fantastic n. 1 1987 J. J. Pierce Great Themes of Science Fiction (facing title-page) Recent Titles in Contributions to the Study of Science Fiction and Fantasy Series Editor: Marshall Tynan Forms of the Fantastic: Selected Essays from the Third International Conference on the Fantastic in Literature and Film William Coyle, editor The Fantastic in World Literature and the Arts: Selected Essays from the Fifth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts Donald E. Morse, editor
near-future adj. 1987 J. J. Pierce Great Themes of Science Fiction v. 86 Leinster’s ‘Politics’ (1932), a near-future war story, turns on the use of automatic range finders as the decisive element in a Pacific naval battle.
uchronian adj. 1987 J. J. Pierce Great Themes of Science Fiction ix. 183 Uchronian sf thus developed independently of the tradition of time travel and time paradoxes in Anglo-American sf; indeed, the first important work on the time travel-theme is found in Rene Barjavel’s Future Times Three (1943), in which the paradox of a man’s killing his ancestor is developed rather laboriously.