John W. Campbell, Jr.

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John W. Campbell, Jr.

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86 Quotations from John W. Campbell, Jr.

airlock n. 1930 J. W. Campbell Black Star Passes in Amazing Stories Quarterly Fall 523/1 Through the air-locks the great ships settled into their world.
atomics n. 1 1932 J. W. Campbell Electronic Siege in Wonder Stories Apr. 1247/2 The slim, graceful ship rose smoothly into the atmosphere…as the gentle hum of mighty Farrel Atomics poured their millions of horsepower into the McKinley space-drive discs.
chronoscope n. 1936 ‘D. A. Stuart’ Elimination in Astounding Stories May 57/1 I shouldn’t have told the police about my chronoscope. But I put the apparatus in, and I think I got it in right, and John, it makes the near-future images better, but what do you think—it cuts out some of the long-range tracks.
chronoscope n. 1958 J. W. Campbell in Astounding Science Fiction Aug. 106 The editorial chronoscope, whereby we precog the future, developed a fault, somehow, when we were making up the July issue.
contraterrene adj. 1942 J. W. Campbell Supernova Centaurus in Astounding Science Fiction Feb. 6/1 One of the most common of the more spectacular things, of course—but not to be rated with a direct collision of stars—itself probably divided into two orders of spectacle; first order being a collision between a star made up of terrene matter and a contraterrene-matter star, and a second-order spectacle involving simply two stars of the same matter type.
contraterrene adj. 1966 J. W. Campbell Islands of Space i. 12 As a result, about half of the lead fed into the chamber became contraterrene lead! The atoms just turned themselves inside out, so to speak, giving us an atom with positrons circling a negatively charged nucleus.
credit n. 1934 J. W. Campbell Mightiest Machine in Astounding Stories Dec. 23/1 Right enough, and tell me why I have to build that five-million-credit flying laboratory.
deflector n. 1935 J. W. Campbell Conquest of the Planets in Amazing Stories Mar. 68/2 The magnetic deflectors of the fort would have been loaded to the uttermost.
earthlike adj. 1943 J. W. Campbell Arithmetic & Empire in Astounding Science Fiction Nov. 3/2 Since a planet habitable for humankind will, of necessity, be Earthlike, an average population per planet of one billion would be conservative.
earth-normal n. 1932 J. W. Campbell Electronic Siege in Wonder Stories Apr. 1249/1 Like the Patrol cruisers, the lifeless, defenseless ship careened on through space, her acceleration dropping immediately to Earth normal as automatic machines took up the unconscious pilot’s duties.
Earthward adj. 1951 J. W. Campbell Moon Is Hell! 10 Dr. James Harwood Garner was the leader of this party of carefully chosen men, and in the name of the United States of America, he claimed the so-called dark half of the moon. Half a world! Millions, tens of millions of square miles of utterly barren surface, surface never seen by Terrestrian eyes, save when, five years before, Capt. Roger Wilson had circumnavigated the moon twice, landing for two brief days on the Earthward side, and had claimed that.
escape ship n. 1932 J. W. Campbell, Jr. Space Rays in Wonder Stories Dec. 585/1 Lt. Lane and his men were dumped unceremoniously into this tiny escape ship, and turned adrift, without radio or weapons. Lane was heading with all speed for Mars, some thirty million miles away.
faster than light adv. 1936 J. W. Campbell Uncertainty in Amazing Stories Oct. 19/2 ‘No, no, you asteroid—that’s not it. He went off faster than light itself!’ ‘Eh—what? Faster than light? That can’t be done—’
floater n. 1935 ‘D. A. Stuart’ The Machine in Astounding Stories Feb. 73/2 A dark shadow drifted slowly across the room, and they turned to see a five-passenger floater sinking slowly, gently, to Earth.
force screen n. 1932 J. W. Campbell Last Evolution in Amazing Stories Aug. 416/2 But, they attacked in such numbers that fully half the fleet was destroyed by their explosions before the induction beam fleet arrived. These beams were, to our amazement, quite useless, being instantly absorbed by a force-screen, and the remaining ships sailed on undisturbed, our torpedoes being exhausted.
free fall n. 1931 J. W. Campbell Islands of Space in Amazing Stories Quarterly Spring 167/1 Since they were to use the space control, though, they would be subject to infinite acceleration, it would be a free fall, and Fuller would remain helplessly weightless.
future history n. 1941 J. W. Campbell in Astounding Science-Fiction Feb. 67 All Heinlein’s science-fiction is laid against a common background of a proposed future history of the world and of the United States.
gravitic adj. 1935 J. W. Campbell Mightiest Machine in Astounding Stories Mar. 112/1 To the great weapons…he added…ball magnetic and ball gravitic bombs.
gravity n. 1931 J. W. Campbell, Jr. Islands of Space in Amazing Stories Quarterly Spring 161/1 We can develop an acceleration of ten earth gravities either forward or backward, and more if the human body will stand it.
gravity n. 1930 J. W. Campbell, Jr. Black Star Passes in Amazing Stories Quarterly Fall 497/1 Each man seemed laboring under the load of three gravities and four gravities as the ships flashed on at ever higher speeds.
gravity drive n. 1932 J. W. Campbell, Jr. Invaders from the Infinite in Amazing Stories Quarterly Spring–Summer 219/1 He made a new ship…. It was equipped with gravity drive, and time distortion speed apparatus, and his far better trained mind finished this smaller ship with his titanic tools in less than the two days that it took them to reach Venone.
groundcar n. 1930 J. W. Campbell The Voice of the Void in Amazing Stories Quarterly Summer 400/1 Now the four habitable planets were at once settled upon. Already they had been carefully mapped, and the Supreme Council had drawn up a plan for the use of the vast planets. More area there was than they needed now, by far, so the cities were scattered widely over the globes. Mere planetary distances meant nothing to them. And all the areas between were carefully preserved as vast, natural parks. Through them wound roads for the little ground cars, so that the people might better see the beauties of the place. And some of the harmless animals would be permitted to live that the future population might know them.
heat ray n. 1930 J. W. Campbell Black Star Passes in Amazing Stories Quarterly Fall 521/2 The heat ray was, even when working at full capacity, quite ineffective against the ten-man ships, when produced by the small mechanism of the Nigrian one-man ships, but the great rays from the monster interstellar liners were fatal.
home planet n. 1930 J. W. Campbell Black Star Passes in Amazing Stories Quarterly Fall 519/1 The training of their operators was the most serious problem, and one that had been finally solved by a very abbreviated training course in the actual manipulation of the controls on the home planet, and subsequent training as the squadrons raced on their courses away from Earth.
homeworld n. 1932 J. W. Campbell Invaders from the Infinite in Amazing Stories Quarterly Spring 154/1 But I am afraid that it will be all we can do to protect our own world if this enemy attacks soon, and I fear they will. Since they have a base in this universe, it is impossible to believe that all ships did not report back to the home world at stated intervals.
hyperspace n. 1931 J. W. Campbell Islands of Space in Amazing Stories Quarterly Spring 161/2 Well we would be stuck if we didn’t have this new method, for the acceleration would take too long. However, in the hyperspace we are going into, a new condition exists. Well you go into a hyperspace and move at any speed you please. I wonder then, how are you going to see where you are going?
intergalactic adj. 1932 J. W. Campbell Jr. Invaders from Infinite in Amazing Stories Quarterly Spring–Summer 154/1 A race which had been able to cross the vast gulf of inter[-]galactic space in the days when Terrestrians were still developing the airplane.
Jovian n. 1 1932 J. W. Campbell Space Rays in Wonder Stories Dec. 586/1 Barclay was a type of man seen rather rarely on the minor planets. He was a Jovian.
jump n. 1932 J. W. Campbell Invaders from the Infinite in Amazing Stories Quarterly Spring 217/2 So far behind them now as to be almost lost in the far scattered universes, lay their own Island, and carefully they photographed and marked it. Then they photographed the Universe that now lay less than twenty million light years ahead. […] Carefully, running forward in jumps of five million light years, forty-five second drives, they worked nearer.
kiloyear n. 1945 J. W. Campbell Limits in Astounding Science-Fiction Apr. 5/2 Remember that homo sapiens has been around from one hundred to two hundred fifty kiloyears.
light-century n. 1966 J. W. Campbell Islands of Space xviii. 153 They stopped every light century until they reached a point where the star was merely a dim point, almost lost in the myriad of stars around it.
light-hour n. 1931 J. W. Campbell Islands of Space in Amazing Stories Quarterly Spring 187/2 When those two suns crash—well, we would never be able to escape if the space control breaks down before we are at least two light hours away!
light-second n. 1930 J. W. Campbell Metal Horde in Amazing Stories Apr. 12/2 The great control ships directed the dive of the radio-control-ships, making the distance one-twentieth part of a light second.
lightspeed n. 1 1932 J. W. Campbell Invaders from the Infinite in Amazing Stories Quarterly Spring 148/1 The skilful hands at the controls were turning adjustments now, and that disc of flame seemed to leap toward him with a hundred light-speeds, growing to a disc as large as a dime in an instant, while the myriad points of the stars seemed to scatter like frightened chickens, fleeing from the growing sun, out of the screen.
lightspeed n. 1 1932 J. W. Campbell Invaders from the Infinite in Amazing Stories Quarterly Spring 222/1 Again a tiny ship entered Thett’s far-flung atmosphere, and slowed to less than a light speed, and sent its signal call ahead.
light-speed n. 2 1932 J. W. Campbell Invaders from the Infinite in Amazing Stories Quarterly Spring 148/1 The skilful hands at the controls were turning adjustments now, and that disc of flame seemed to leap toward him with a hundred light-speeds, growing to a disc as large as a dime in an instant, while the myriad points of the stars seemed to scatter like frightened chickens, fleeing from the growing sun, out of the screen.
light-speed n. 2 1932 J. W. Campbell Invaders from the Infinite in Amazing Stories Quarterly Spring 222/1 Again a tiny ship entered Thett’s far-flung atmosphere, and slowed to less than a light speed, and sent its signal call ahead.
matter transmitter n. [1930 J. W. Campbell The Voice of the Void in Amazing Stories Quarterly Summer 392/1 Of the fleet of ten great ships, and the accompanying matter-sender, six ships returned. The rest floated out there in the interplanetary space around Betelguese.]
megayear n. 1935 J. W. Campbell Night in Astounding Stories Oct. 20/2 With what we have learned in the uncounted dusty megayears since, we might have been able to save him.
mother ship n. 1930 J. W. Campbell Black Star Passes in Amazing Stories Quarterly Fall 516/1 Since I expect to make long trips in them, I think we will do best if we make several types of ships. Three should suffice: a small single man cruiser, with no bunk or living quarters, just a little power plant and weapon. One that can jump out of the way of a ray so quickly that it will be very hard to hit, and at the same time, because of its ray, be very dangerous. There will have to be some place for the operator of this ship to sleep and eat. I think the easiest way to solve that is to have a large fleet of mother ships—ships with a twenty-man crew, but still very active, and very deadly. These should have bunks and living quarters for the crew. Some men would be sleeping in the bunks all the time. The men could take turns running the one-man ships and sleeping.
mother ship n. 1930 J. W. Campbell Black Star Passes in Amazing Stories Quarterly Fall 516/1 The ships must be capable of about six or seven thousand miles a second, and that implies all the acceleration a human being can endure. Since I expect to make long trips in them, I think we will do best if we make several types of ships. Three should suffice: a small single man cruiser, with no bunk or living quarters, just a little power plant and weapon. One that can jump out of the way of a ray so quickly that it will be very hard to hit, and at the same time, because of its ray, be very dangerous. There will have to be some place for the operator of this ship to sleep and eat. I think the easiest way to solve that is to have a large fleet of mother ships—ships with a twenty-man crew, but still very active, and very deadly. These should have bunks and living quarters for the crew. Some men would be sleeping in the bunks all the time. The men could take turns running the one-man ships and sleeping. There will also be some ten-man scout cruisers. These will be used in the same way, but will have a smaller fleet of ships dependent on them.
needle-beam n. 1936 J. W. Campbell Brain Stealers of Mars in Thrilling Wonder Stories Dec. 27/1 Then he went around with an opened ion-gun with a needle beam and poked everything visible with it.
normal space n. 1931 J. W. Campbell Islands of Space in Amazing Stories Quarterly Spring 215/1 They were moving slowly, in normal space, only four miles a second, so they were falling swiftly toward the planet.
normal space n. 1932 J. W. Campbell Invaders from the Infinite in Amazing Stories Quarterly Spring 159/1 The attraction of the giant sun was draining the energy from the coils so rapidly now, that at last Arcot was forced to get into normal space, while the planet was still close to a million miles from them.
normal space n. 1932 J. W. Campbell Invaders from the Infinite in Amazing Stories Quarterly Spring 156/2 But this is the secret: the ship attains the speed only by going out of space. Nothing in space can attain the speed of light, save radiation! Nothing in normal space. But, we alter space, make space along patterns we choose, and so distort it that the natural speed of radiation is enormously greater. In fact, we so change space that nothing can go slower than a speed we fix.
nova n. 1942 J. W. Campbell Supernova Centaurus in Astounding Science-Fiction Feb. 6/2 We've considered what might happen if Sol itself went nova. If it should go supernova, no worse could happen; Earth and all life on it would be fused and volatilized in either case.
precog v. 1958 J. W. Campbell in Astounding Science Fiction Aug. 106 The editorial chronoscope, whereby we precog the future, developed a fault, somehow, when we were making up the July issue.
ray v. 1930 J. W. Campbell Black Star Passes in Amazing Stories Quarterly Fall 509/1 So the ships had been rayed apart, and when Arcot had left, their burning atmosphere had been evolving mighty tongues of flame shooting a mile into the air.
ray gun n. 1930 J. W. Campbell Black Star Passes in Amazing Stories Quarterly Fall 505/2 Soon they saw a hand reaching out with a ray gun; then another hand with a different ray gun, from behind the silent engine; a sudden crash of metal, a groan and quiet.
ray pistol n. 1930 J. W. Campbell Black Star Passes in Amazing Stories Quarterly Fall 501/2 He drew his ray pistol, and adjusted it carefully… The trigger gave him control over power.
ray projector n. 1930 J. W. Campbell Black Star Passes in Amazing Stories Quarterly Fall 519/2 Earth and Venus were each equipped with gigantic ray projectors, mighty ray guns that could destroy anything, even a body as large as the moon, at a distance of ten thousand miles.
skyhook n. 2 1960 J. W. Campbell in Astounding Science Fact & Fiction Apr. 5/1 So: assume some form of true space-drive. A modified sky-hook or an antigravity gadget—anything. It’s a space-truck—not a delicate and hyper-expensive rocket. It can carry tons, and work for years.
Sol n. 1932 J. W. Campbell Invaders from Infinite in Amazing Stories Quarterly Spring 211/1 There were twelve gigantic worlds, each far larger than Jupiter of Sol, and larger than Stwall of Talso’s sun, Renl.
Sol n. 1935 ‘D. A. Stuart’ Night in Astounding Stories Oct. 13/2 That was Earth. And it was old Sol. Old—old Sol. It was the time axis that coil distorted, not gravity at all.
Sol n. 1942 J. W. Campbell Supernova Centaurus in Astounding Science-Fiction Feb. 6/2 We've considered what might happen if Sol itself went nova. If it should go supernova, no worse could happen; Earth and all life on it would be fused and volatilized in either case.
Solarian n. 2 1930 J. W. Campbell Black Star Passes in Amazing Stories Quarterly Fall 521/2 The small ships of the Nigrians were beginning to take a terrific toll in the thin ranks of the Solarians. The coming of the Rocket Squad had been welcomed indeed! They were able to maneuver as quickly as the enemy; the little ships, all one-man ships, were harder to spot than the Solarian ten and twenty-man ships. The Solarian one-man ships were even smaller than the Nigrian one-man ships, and some of these did a tremendous amount of damage.
Solarian n. 2 1930 J. W. Campbell Metal Horde in Amazing Stories Apr. 11/1 The Solarians…had twenty billions to back them up, and they had the resources of three planets.
Solarian adj. 1930 J. W. Campbell Black Star Passes in Amazing Stories Quarterly Fall 521/2 The small ships of the Nigrians were beginning to take a terrific toll in the thin ranks of the Solarians. The coming of the Rocket Squad had been welcomed indeed! They were able to maneuver as quickly as the enemy; the little ships, all one-man ships, were harder to spot than the Solarian ten and twenty-man ships. The Solarian one-man ships were even smaller than the Nigrian one-man ships, and some of these did a tremendous amount of damage.
Solarian adj. 1930 J. W. Campbell Voice of the Void in Amazing Stories Quarterly Summer 395/1 Even in the blazing minor star they lived, darting in and coming out of its flames as unconcernedly as a Solarian ship would dart in or out of an atmosphere.
space drive n. 1932 J. W. Campbell Invaders from Infinite in Amazing Stories Quarterly Spring 154/2 There we shall have plenty of work to do, but on the way we are going to stop at Mars and pick up that very valuable ship of theirs and make a very careful examination for possible new weapons, their system of speed-drive, and their regular space-drive, if it is not the same.
space drive n. 1932 J. W. Campbell Electronic Siege in Wonder Stories 3 Apr. 1247/2 The slim, graceful ship rose smoothly into the atmosphere, angling slightly up, then driving forward as the gentle hum of mighty Farrel Atomics poured their millions of horsepower into the McKinley space-drive discs.
space force n. 1935 J. W. Campbell Mightiest Machine in Astounding Stories Jan. 151/2 He talked to the space-force staff and showed them a greater source of power lay in the sun.
space freighter n. 1932 J. W. Campbell Invaders from Infinite in Amazing Stories Quarterly Spring 195/1 It was one of the commercial space freighters plying between Nansal, Sator, Earth and Venus that had brought the news of this war to him, Torlos explained, and he, as the new Trade Coordinator and Fourth of the Four who now ruled Nansal, had suggested that they go to the aid of the man who had so aided them in their great war with Sator.
space freighter n. 1930 J. W. Campbell Voice of the Void in Amazing Stories Quarterly Summer 392/1 High in the jet black sky, a scant hundred miles from the ground below, a mighty space-freighter was taking off for Venus. The thin belt of atmosphere permitted it to reach a high speed quickly. Already it was in full stride and heading at 1,000 miles a second for Venus.
spaceline n. 1930 J. W. Campbell Black Star Passes in Amazing Stories Quarterly Fall 499/1 The bonds of friendship between the two planets had grown swiftly in those three years, and they were already linked by many regular space lines. These ships made the trips as frequently as the relative positions of the planets permitted.
space liner n. 1932 J. W. Campbell Electronic Siege in Wonder Stories 3 Apr. 1247/1 A stream of famous scientists had been coming aboard the space liner Vega all afternoon.
space lock n. 1930 J. W. Campbell Black Star Passes in Amazing Stories Quarterly Fall 520/2 A quarter of an hour later the people who were to remain here on this planet saw the first of the monsters of the space rise slowly from the ground and leap swiftly forward, then, one every ten seconds, the others leapt in swift pursuit, rushing swiftly across half a world to the giant space lock that would let them out into the void. Then one at a time they passed out into the mighty sea of space, Pirates of Space! From one system, careening on its way through the void, they were sweeping out to another system, to take it, and overrun it with their people!
space pilot n. 1932 J. W. Campbell Invaders from Infinite in Amazing Stories Quarterly Spring 148/1 The change from the energy-less, flavored pastes that made up the principal bulk of a space-pilot’s diet, to prevent over-eating, when no energy was used in walking in the weightless ship, was indeed a welcome change.
space pirate n. 1932 J. W. Campbell Invaders from Infinite in Amazing Stories Quarterly Spring 149/1 They don’t like dueling with these space-pirates using the molecular rays, and since molecular rays have such a tremendous commercial value, we can’t prohibit the sale of ray apparatus.
space travelling n. 1931 J. W. Campbell Islands of Space in Amazing Stories Quarterly Spring The strange, weightless sensation of space-traveling makes it very hard to recognize normally familiar sensations.
space yacht n. 1934 ‘D. Stuart’ Twilight in Astounding Stories Nov. 52/1 Three ships. One must have been fifty feet long and fifteen in diameter. It was a yacht, a space yacht, probably.
star system n. 1932 J. W. Campbell Invaders from Infinite in Amazing Stories Quarterly Spring 168/1 For the ship represents a thing of enormous value to our world. And, we think, to this entire star-system.
supernova n. 1942 J. W. Campbell Supernova Centaurus in Astounding Science-Fiction Feb. 6/2 We’ve considered what might happen if Sol itself went nova. If it should go supernova, no worse could happen; Earth and all life on it would be fused and volatilized in either case.
system-wide adj. 1935 J. W. Campbell Contest of the Planets in Amazing Stories Jan. 26/1 Had men been afflicted with some titanic system-wide plague?
Terranian n. [1931 J. W. Campbell Islands of Space in Amazing Stories Quarterly Spring 193/2 I am sure that a Terranian lion or tiger would find us quite as edible as would an Earthly lion.]
Terrestrian n. 1930 J. W. Campbell Black Star Passes in Amazing Stories Quarterly Fall 516/2 This rocket squad was composed almost solely of Terrestrians, for they were used to the greater gravity of Earth, and could stand greater acceleration than could Venerians.
terrestrian adj. 1930 J. W. Campbell Black Star Passes in Amazing Stories Quarterly Fall 500/1 In the meantime the Terrestrian and Venerian governments were already preparing vigorously for further inroads.
terrestrian adj. 1951 J. W. Campbell Moon Is Hell! 10 Dr. James Harwood Garner was the leader of this party of carefully chosen men, and in the name of the United States of America, he claimed the so-called dark half of the moon. Half a world! Millions, tens of millions of square miles of utterly barren surface, surface never seen by Terrestrian eyes, save when, five years before, Capt. Roger Wilson had circumnavigated the moon twice, landing for two brief days on the Earthward side, and had claimed that.
time travel n. 1941 J. W. Campbell Letter 1 Oct. in R. A. Heinlein & V. Heinlein Grumbles from Grave (1990) 21 You've taken a…highly intriguing point in the whole theory of time-travel, and built it up to the proportions it deserved.
time viewer n. 1940 J. W. Campbell in Astounding Science-Fiction Aug. 6 Wanted: a chronoscope. Such a time viewer would be darned handy in many ways, but at the moment—”and this moment in which I am writing is so long gone as to be difficult to recall from its point of history by the time this is read—”one would be useful in devising this page.
tin can n. 1938 ‘D. A. Stuart’ Dead Knowledge in Astounding Stories Jan. 59/2 Two men for three years, in a tin can, makes one man. Nerve friction, as they call it.
tractor beam n. [1930 J. W. Campbell Voice of the Void in Amazing Stories Quarterly Summer 392/1 And now, as a great freighter swung low, a machine on the ground below turned on a ray that stabbed out sharp and brilliant; a moment later the freighter tug lifted a half-million-ton piece of the planet on its attractor beams and rapidly gained headway as it shot off toward distant Venus. ]
Venerian n. 1 1930 J. W. Campbell Black Star Passes in Amazing Stories Nov. 721/2 They reached a large room, where already there had gathered in the semicircle of seats a hundred or so seven-foot Venerians.
Venerian n. 1 1930 J. W. Campbell Black Star Passes in Amazing Stories Quarterly Fall 505/1 There were six of them, tall men, about seven feet high, and they walked with the rather labored step of a Venerean, although they weren’t Venereans, for their skin and flesh was a strange white, which looked like raw dough.
Venerian adj. 1930 J. W. Campbell Black Star Passes in Amazing Stories Nov. 721/2 Out into the maze of halls they went again, now led by the kindly, seven-foot Venerian scientist.
viewscreen n. 1932 J. W. Campbell Invaders from Infinite in Amazing Stories Quarterly Spring 174/1 Stel Felso Theu looked on with vast interest as the strange planet loomed larger and still larger on the distorted view-screen.