Paul Di Filippo

Image of Paul Di Filippo
Paul Di Filippo

See first quotes from Paul Di Filippo

26 Quotations from Paul Di Filippo

big dumb object n. 2011 P. Di Filippo On Books in Asimov’s Science Fiction Jan. 103/2 The reader realizes that all along Guy Adams has been brilliantly expounding on a Big Dumb Object in the manner of Clarke’s Rama! Nice fakeout, sir!
Bradburian adj. 2012 P. Di Filippo On Books in Asimov’s Science Fiction Aug. 108/2 A Bradburyian automated domicile features in ‘The House That Jackdaw Built’.
Bradburyish adj. 1995 P. Di Filippo in Asimov’s Science Fiction Oct. 162/1 They exhibit a wide-ranging talent, comfortable and proficient with such diverse tales as the Bradburyish ‘The Ground Under Man’ or the Barrington-Bayley-like ‘Another Brush With The Fuzz’ or the La Fontaine-style fable ‘Flies’.
Ellisonian adj. 1995 P. Di Filippo Books in Science Fiction Age Jan. 10/2 A combination of MIT-level blueprint sophistication and Frank Paul gosh-wow panoramas, they succeed admirably in melding the Asimovian and Ellisonian halves of the project.
Ellisonian adj. 2006 P. Di Filippo On Books in Asimov’s Science Fiction 135/2 ‘The New Ecology’ speaks to the Ellisonian notion of strange new gods arising to fill vacant niches, but does so in a hopeful rather than despairing fashion.
gengineer n. 2012 P. Di Filippo On Books in Asimov’s Science Fiction Jan. 102/2 We are first introduced to gene maven Harmony Somata, head of the bio-firm named Floracopia, and her four identical daughters, chief of whom from the reader’s perspective is Clio, also a gengineer.
graviton n. 2006 R. Rucker & P. Di Filippo Elves of Subdimensions in Mad Professor (2007) According to orthodox rhizomal subdimension theory, if someone could miraculously deliver a proper sequence of presses to the button, the field-programmed quantum circuit would begin diverting gravitons into the subdimensions. And whoever held the talisman would be able to fly. The ultimate keyboard cheat.
illo n. 2015 P. Di Filippo On Books in Asimov’s Science Fiction Mar. 108/1 A gorgeous cover by Richard Corben and interior illos by Rodger Gerberding add to the sepulchral luster.
kipple n. 1994 P. Di Filippo On Books in Asimov’s Science Fiction Dec. 161/2 The props burdening the characters are the everyday kipple and kitsch one hardly notices anymore: souvenir plastic tomahawks and melmac cups.
mind control n. 2003 P. Di Filippo Seeing is Believing in Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction Apr. 139 The only thing I could come up with is, this guy’s using some radical, unknown kind of mind-control device.
pantropy n. 1995 P. Di Filippo On Books in Asimov’s Science Fiction Oct. 168/1 In focusing on pantropy (a useful term coined by James Blish to designate the retrofitting of humanity to their environment) as opposed to the currently more popular terraforming, Pohl explored an overlooked Mars-colonizing approach that strikes one as still fresh.
planetary romance n. 2013 P. Di Filippo On Books in Asimov’s Science Fiction Aug. 108/1 He’s kept some steampunk trappings while moving into the territory of Burroughsian planetary romance.
proto-cyberpunk adj. 1995 P. Di Filippo On Books in Asimov’s Science Fiction Oct. 168/1 In focusing on pantropy (a useful term coined by James Blish to designate the retrofitting of humanity to their environment) as opposed to the currently more popular terraforming, Pohl explored an overlooked Mars-colonizing approach that strikes one as still fresh. With its occasional references to hackers and jacking in, as well as its subtly foreshadowed climax involving spontaneous AI’s evolving out of ‘the net,’ this book is plainly a neglected proto-cyberpunk ancestor.
sensawunda n. 2005 P. Di Filippo On Books in Asimov’s Science Fiction Mar. 134/1 If you don’t get your full complement of sensawunda from this tale, you’ve been tamed and declawed by too much literary canoodling.
sercon adj. 2001 P. Di Filippo On Books in Asimov’s Science Fiction May 139/2 Issue Number 52 of this ‘sercon’ zine features an informative profile of the late Doc Lowndes by Mike Ashley.
SF/F/H n. 2012 P. Di Filippo On Books in Asimov’s Science Fiction June 107/1 How can an entire category, essential to the development and history of SF/F/H, simply be written off on strictly mercenary terms?
slipstreamy adj. 2007 P. Di Filippo On Books in Asimov’s Science Fiction Sept. 139/2 The esteemed literary reputation of Elizabeth Hand rests mainly on her novels, eight masterful, slippery, slipstreamy volumes.
sophont n. 2012 P. Di Filippo On Books in Asimov’s Science Fiction Mar. 107/2 Soon we have also picked up other famous personages from the series: David Falkayn…and dragon-like sophont Adzel.
space explorer n. 2011 P. Di Filippo On Books in Asimov’s Science Fiction July 109/2 Its sequel, ‘The Astronauts’, introduces a female space explorer for a return visit to Mars.
space fiction n. 2006 P. Di Filippo On Books in Asimov’s Science Fiction Sept. 137/1 Eric Brown…[has] found a scientifically respectable way to combine zombie fiction and space fiction, to the one-shot betterment of both genres.
steampunkish adj. 2004 Paul Di Filippo On Books in Asimov’s Science Fiction July 140/2 Nevins has amazingly ferreted out hundreds of obscure Victorian icons and other allusions that went into the composition of this steampunkish comic.
steampunkish adj. 2004 P. di Filippo On Books in Asimov’s Science Fiction Apr.–May 230/2 Now, with his co-writer David Tischman and artist Niko Henrichon, he’s turned his hand to a steampunkish adventure, one that summons up the glory days of television’s The Wild, Wild West.
technothriller n. 2002 P. Di Filippo On Books in Asimov’s Science Fiction May 132/1 Ever since Michael Crichton’s The Andromeda Strain (1969), the type of novel that’s come to be known as the ‘techno-thriller’ has assumed the status of science fiction’s sexier younger sister, stealing much of the public spotlight away from SF. Set in near-future venues often no farther away than the day after tomorrow, these novels have appropriated all our trademark glitz of technology and hardware, added bracing doses of realpolitik and suspense, then arrayed themselves in streamlined, whiz-bang plots, however improbable. Casting off our genre’s constraints of rigorous speculation, techno-thrillers can be outrageously seductive to the broad masses of readers in a way that hardcore SF, with its more ‘serious’—and, face it, sometimes stodgy—concerns cannot.
uchronia n. 1995 P. Di Filippo On Books in Asimov’s Science Fiction Oct. 173/2 Vonarburg’s prose is sensual and measured, richly descriptive, especially in such domestic scenes as the death of Catherine’s father. One of the attractions of uchronias is how they can present attractive worlds that are at once familiar and exotic, and Vonarburg’s thick depiction makes her unique Canada seem like an alluring alternative to our world—at least until it begins to fray.
uchronia n. 2004 P. Di Filippo On Books in Asimov’s Science Fiction July 133/1 From small acorns, mighty oaks grow. With the original motivation of writing a ‘Communist ghost story,’ Howard Waldrop has produced one of his patented alternate histories, a uchronia of surpassing strangeness. A Better World’s in Birth! (Golden Gryphon, trade paper, $15.95, 51 pages, ISBN unavailable.) The year is 1876, and all of Europe has experienced two decades of socialist rule. But the worker’s paradise is about to come undone, thanks to the ghostly apparitions of Karl Marx and other founders of the state.
uchronian adj. 1995 P. Di Filippo On Books in Asimov’s Science Fiction Oct. 172/1 Finally, Conner slyly plays the uchronian game by inserting several references to the fates of Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway, and Scott Fitzgerald, among others.