Hugo Gernsback

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Hugo Gernsback

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17 Quotations from Hugo Gernsback

anti-gravitation n. 1927 H. Gernsback Interplanetary Travel in Amazing Stories Feb. 981/1 No doubt in time we shall find means for negativing [sic] gravitation, but until that time such anti-gravitation machines must lie in the distant future.
anti-gravitational adj. 1925 H. Gernsback Ralph 124C 41+ (1952) 120 Our anti-gravitational screen still let through some of the gravitational waves, or fifty per cent of the energy, which we could not seem to counteract.
biocomputer n. 1961 H. Gernsback in Amazing Stories Apr. 88/2 There will come the future amazing day…when Amazing Stories will be composed, or perhaps outlined in detail, not by human authors, but by an electronic biocomputer-menograph (menos-mind).
earthling n. 1930 H. Gernsback Life on Other Planets in Wonder Stories Dec. 629/1 The intelligence of Martians, if there be any, must be far in advance of that of earthlings.
grandfather paradox n. [1929 H. Gernsback The Question of Time-Traveling in Science Wonder Stories Dec. 610 Suppose I can travel back into time, let me say 200 years; and I visit the homestead of my great great great grand-father, and am able to take part in the life of his time. I am thus enabled to shoot him, while he is still a young man and as yet unmarried. From this it will be noted that I could have prevented my own birth.]
science fiction n. 1929 H. Gernsback in Science Wonder Stories June 5/1 I started the movement of science fiction in America in 1908…. At that time it was an experiment. Science fiction authors were scarce. Ibid. 5/2 Science fiction, as published in Science Wonder Stories, is a tremendous new force in America. They are the stories that are discussed by inventors, by scientists, and in the classroom.
scientific fiction n. 1923 Science & Invention Aug. (cover) Scientific Fiction Number [i.e. issue].
scientifiction n. 1916 H. Gernsback in Electrical Experimenter Jan. 474/1 I am supposed to report Münchhaussen’s [sic] doings; am supposed to be writing fiction, scientifiction, to be correct.
space biology n. 1953 H. Gernsback Science-Fiction Semantics in Science-Fiction + Aug. 2/1 As new situations develop in science-fiction, as science progresses, new terms must be coined. Thus in 1911 the writer probably was the first to use the words space-flyer, space flying, space sickness, anti-gravitator, and many other words in common use today. Although the vocabulary of modern science-fiction is rich today, it is nothing compared with what it will become during the next 25 years. It is also true that science-fiction authors and scientists launch terms that never should have been used. As an example, one might cite a recent addition: space-medicine. To us, this is an unfortunate term, because medicine implies the curing or mitigation of disease. Space-medicine is constantly being used to investigate man’s reactions to free fall and other phenomena, which have nothing to do with disease per se. In our opinion, the correct term is: space-biology.
space flyer n. 1 1930 H. Gernsback Stations in Space in Air Wonder Stories Apr. 869/1 Once the space flyer has reached the critical speed, it will continue to revolve around the earth.
space flyer n. 1 1927 H. Gernsback Space Flying in Amazing Stories Nov. 725/2 It is one thing to construct a practical space flyer which fits many conditions theoretically, but it is another thing altogether to navigate it successfully in space.
space sick adj. 1912 H. Gernsback Ralph 124C 41+in Mod. Electrics Mar. 884/2 For the first time since he left Earth he became space-sick.
space sick adj. 1929 H. Gernsback in Amazing Stories Quarterly Winter 52/2 Ralph grew more despondent each day, and his hope of bringing his betrothed back to life grew dimmer and dimmer as the hours rolled on. For the first time since he left the Earth he became space-sick. Space-sickness is one of the most unpleasant sensations that a human being can experience. Not all are subject to it, and it does not last longer than forty-eight hours, after which it never recurs. On Earth, gravitational action to a certain degree exerts a certain pull on the brain. Out in space, with practically no gravitational action, this pull ceases. When this happens, the brain is no longer subjected to the accustomed pull, and it expands slightly in all directions, just as a balloon loses its pear shape and becomes round when an aeronaut cuts loose, to drop down with his parachute. The effect on the brain results in space-sickness, the first symptoms being violent melancholy and depression followed by a terrible and heart-rending longing for Earth. During this stage, at which the patient undergoes great mental suffering, the optical nerves usually become affected and everything appears upside down, as if the sufferer were looking through a lens. It becomes necessary to take large doses ofSiltagol, otherwise brain fever may develop.
spacesickness n. 1912 H. Gernsback Ralph 124C 41+ in Modern Electrics Mar. 844/2 Space-sickness is one of the most peculiar sensations that can befall a human being.
spacesickness n. 1929 H. Gernsback in Amazing Stories Quarterly Winter 52/2 Ralph grew more despondent each day, and his hope of bringing his betrothed back to life grew dimmer and dimmer as the hours rolled on. For the first time since he left the Earth he became space-sick. Space-sickness is one of the most unpleasant sensations that a human being can experience. Not all are subject to it, and it does not last longer than forty-eight hours, after which it never recurs. On Earth, gravitational action to a certain degree exerts a certain pull on the brain. Out in space, with practically no gravitational action, this pull ceases. When this happens, the brain is no longer subjected to the accustomed pull, and it expands slightly in all directions, just as a balloon loses its pear shape and becomes round when an aeronaut cuts loose, to drop down with his parachute. The effect on the brain results in space-sickness, the first symptoms being violent melancholy and depression followed by a terrible and heart-rending longing for Earth. During this stage, at which the patient undergoes great mental suffering, the optical nerves usually become affected and everything appears upside down, as if the sufferer were looking through a lens. It becomes necessary to take large doses ofSiltagol, otherwise brain fever may develop.
space station n. 1930 H. Gernsback Stations in Space in Air Wonder Stories Apr. 869/1 It might be asked: what useful purpose would be served by converting a space-flyer into a permanent, rapidly-revolving satellite of the earth in this manner? Professor Hermann Oberth, perhaps the greatest authority on interplanetary space, points out many uses for such revolving ‘space stations’, as he calls them. A better word, perhaps, would be ‘revolving space observatories’.
Terrestrial n. 1925 H. Gernsback Ralph 124 C 41 + 41 The other was not a Terrestrial, but a visiting Martian. It was impossible to mistake the distinctly Martian cast of countenance. The great black horse eyes in the long, melancholy face, the elongated slightly pointed ears were proof enough. Martians in New York were not sufficiently rare to excite any particular comment. Many made that city their permanent home, although the law on the planet Earth, as well as on Mars, which forbade the intermarrriage of Martians and Terrestrials, kept them from flocking earthwards in any great numbers.